My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

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The Millions Top Ten: August 2018

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for August.

Looking for additional book recommendations? One of the benefits of subscribing to The Millions is access to our exclusive monthly newsletter in which our venerable staffers let you know what they’re reading right now. Learn more here.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
1.

Less

4 months

2.
3.

Lost Empress

4 months

3.
6.

The Ensemble

2 months

4.
5.

Frankenstein in Baghdad

5 months

5.
7.

The Overstory

3 months

6.
4.

The Recovering: Intoxication and its Aftermath

5 months

7.


The Incendiaries

1 month

8.
9.

There There

2 months

9.
10.

Warlight

2 months

10.


The Mars Room

1 month

 

“I have to watch I don’t get arrogant,” said Andrew Sean Greer after a Guardian reporter asked him how he’s changed since winning the Pulitzer for his latest novel, Less. Will he be able to stave off arrogance now that he’s held first position in our Top Ten for two months, though? Bet smart.

So, we bid farewell to two titles ascending to our Hall of Fame this month – The Immortalists and My Favorite Thing is Monsters – and we welcome two newcomers in their place – The Incendiaries and The Mars Room.

Much praise has been heaped upon The Incendiaries, not least of all Celeste Ng’s compliment on R.O. Kwon’s “dazzlingly acrobatic prose.” That admiration might be topped only by Michael Lindgren’s review of The Mars Room in which he called Rachel Kushner “the most vital and interesting American novelist working today.” The point is obvious. Golden rules are hard to find these days, but maybe it’s enough to say that Millions readers always have good taste.

State of California native Tommy Orange’s There There earned a place on the 7-title shortlist for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize this month, and the debut also moved up a spot from ninth to eight on our list. Will that momentum carry it up again next month? Be sure to check back and find out in October. On and on we go.

Next to Orange’s novel on our list in ninth position is Michael Ondaatje’s Warlight, which earned Man Booker longlist recognition last July. Month’s end is when we’ll see if it makes the next round of cuts. List long or short, Ondaatje’s no stranger to any kind.

This month’s near misses included: SeveranceCirce, What We Were PromisedAn American Marriage, and Some Trick. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: July 2018

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for July.

Looking for additional book recommendations? One of the benefits of subscribing to The Millions is access to our exclusive monthly newsletter in which our venerable staffers let you know what they’re reading right now. Learn more here.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
2.

Less

3 months

2.
1.

The Immortalists
6 months

3.
7.

Lost Empress

3 months

4.
6.

The Recovering: Intoxication and its Aftermath

4 months

5.
4.

Frankenstein in Baghdad

4 months

6.


The Ensemble

1 month

7.
10.

The Overstory

2 months

8.
8.

My Favorite Thing is Monsters

6 months

9.


There There

1 month

10.


Warlight

1 month

 

Reflecting on the Great 2018 Book Preview – the first of the year, not the more recent Second-Half preview – it’s interesting to note that of the first six titles we highlighted, four of them have made appearances in our Top Ten. For six months, Jamie Quatro’s Fire Sermon and Denis Johnson’s The Largesse of the Sea Maiden hung around our list; this month they graduate to the Hall of Fame. On their heels, Ahmed Saadawi’s Frankenstein in Baghdad holds fifth position this month, and in two months’ time will likely join Quatro and Johnson in our Hall. Also, among the “near misses” listed at the bottom of this post, you’ll find Leïla Slimani’s The Perfect Nanny, a French story which “tells of good help gone bad,” as our own Matt Seidel put it months ago. From a certain perspective, it’s wild that 66% of the first half dozen books we flagged last January have resonated so much with our audience. In fact, of the 10 titles on this month’s list, 70% of them appeared on that first Book Preview. Put simply: Millions readers, we’re here for y’all. Trust us.

(For the record, the three titles currently on our Top Ten which did not appear in our Book Preview last January: LessThe Overstory and My Favorite Thing is Monsters.)

Three new titles joined our list after Quatro and Johnson’s books moved on to our Hall of Fame and Tayari Jones’s An American Marriage dropped out. The newcomers are Aja Gabel’s The Ensemble, Tommy Orange’s There There, and Michael Ondaatje’s Warlight, which hold the sixth, ninth and tenth positions this month, respectively.

In a preview for our site, Millions editor Lydia Kiesling recommended readers get “a taste of Gabel’s prose [by] read[ing] her Best American Essays-notable piece on grief and eating ortolans in France,” and noted that “Orange’s novel has been called a ‘new kind of American epic’ by the New York Times.” Meanwhile staffer Claire Cameron, while writing about Michael Ondaatje’s latest, mused, “If only Anthony Minghella were still with us to make the movie.”

Overall it’s clear that the Book Preview foretells Top Ten placements. Next month at least two spots should open up for new titles. Will those new books come from our latest Second-Half Preview? Based on the numbers, it looks likely.

This month’s near misses included: Circe, Some TrickThe Mars Room, and The Perfect Nanny. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: June 2018

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for June.

Looking for additional book recommendations? One of the benefits of subscribing to The Millions is access to our exclusive monthly newsletter in which our venerable staffers let you know what they’re reading right now. Learn more here.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
3.

The Immortalists
5 months

2.
4.

Less
2 months

3.
5.

Fire Sermon

6 months

4.
7.

Frankenstein in Baghdad

3 months

5.
8.

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden

6 months

6.
9.

The Recovering: Intoxication and its Aftermath

3 months

7.
10.

Lost Empress

2 months

8.


My Favorite Thing is Monsters

5 months

9.


An American Marriage

1 month

10.


The Overstory

1 month

 

Three books are off to our Hall of Fame this month, but one of them is completely blank, which I believe is a first for our site. Back in November 2017, in Hannah Gersen’s Gift Guide for Readers and Writers, she noted the benefits of the 5-Year Diary‘s design:
The design is unique in that every page represents one day and is divided into five parts, with each part representing one year. So, when you write your entry for Feb 1, you can look back at Feb 1 of the previous year to see what you were doing/writing/reading/thinking/weathering. I think it’s especially useful for writers because if you use the space to track writing and reading projects (as I often do), it’s a great way to gauge your long-term progress.
Accompanying the Diary are two works from Carmen Maria Machado and Jesmyn Ward.

Maria Machado’s Her Body and Other Parties was the darling of our most recent Year in Reading series, picked by seven participants – Jamel Brinkley, Morgan Jerkins, Rakesh Satyal, Julie Buntin, Lidia Yuknavitch, Louise Erdrich and Jeff VanderMeer – who together sang a chorus of Buy this Book, Buy this Book, Buy this Book. Over the chorus came Nathan Goldman, who wrote in his review for our site that “for all its darkness, Her Body and Other Parties is also a beautiful evocation of women’s—especially queer women’s—lives, in all their fullness, vitality, and complex joy. Formally daring, achingly moving, wildly weird, and startling in its visceral and aesthetic impact, Machado’s work is unlike any other.” Evidently, Millions readers dug the tune.

Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing was also well-received, drawing praise from four of the seven Year in Reading participants linked above, as well as from Kima Jones and Sarah Smarsh. In her review for our site, Nur Nasreen Ibrahim observed that “Ward’s fiction is about inherited trauma in a deeply divided society, where the oppressor and the oppressed share a legacy” and she also pointed to the other works invoked within the text. “By invoking [Toni] Morrison and [William] Faulkner for new readers,” Ibrahim wrote, “Ward excavates not only the suffering of her characters, but also the long tradition of fiction about slavery, fiction that grapples with racial injustice that extends into the present.”

Elsewhere on our list this month, My Favorite Thing is Monsters returns after a monthlong hiatus, and newcomers An American Marriage and The Overstory fill our ninth and tenth spots, respectively. In the weeks ahead, we’ll publish our Great Second-Half 2018 Book Preview, and surely several of those upcoming titles will be reflected on our July list. Get ready.

This month’s near misses included: The Mars RoomPachinko, Warlight, The Odyssey, and The World Goes On. See Also: Last month’s list.

2018 Lambda Literary Awards Honor LGBTQ Literature

The 2018 Lambda Literary Awards were announced last night in New York City. The annual award, now in its 30th year, celebrates the “best lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender books of the year and affirm[s] that LGBTQ stories are part of the literature of the world.” In addition to the other awards, Lamdba’s Trustee and Visionary Awards were given to Roxane Gay and Edmund White.

The winners of the 2018 Lambda Literary Awards are as follows:



Lesbian Fiction

Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado (Our review of Machado’s “body horrors” and interview with the author)

Gay Fiction

After the Blue Hour by John Rechy

Bisexual Fiction

The Gift by Barbara Browning

Bisexual Nonfiction

Hunger by Roxane Gay

LGBTQ Nonfiction

How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Transgender Nonfiction

Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity by C. Riley Snorton

Lesbian Memoir/Biography

The Fact of a Body by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

Gay Memoir/Biography

Lives of Great Men: Living and Loving as an African Gay Man by Chike Frankie Edozien

Graphic Novel

My Favorite Thing Is Monsters by Emil Ferris

Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror

Autonomous by Annalee Newitz (the one book reco’d by Robin Sloan in his Year in Reading entry)

 

The full list of winners can be found here.

The Millions Top Ten: April 2018

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for April.

Looking for additional book recommendations? One of the benefits of subscribing to The Millions is access to our exclusive monthly newsletter in which our venerable staffers let you know what they’re reading right now. Learn more here.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
1.

5 Year Diary
5 months

2.
3.

Her Body and Other Parties
5 months

3.
4.

Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process
6 months

4.
5.

Fire Sermon

4 months

5.
7.

The Immortalists
3 months

6.
9.

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden

4 months

7.
8.

Sing, Unburied, Sing

5 months

8.
10.

My Favorite Thing is Monsters

4 months

9.


The Recovering: Intoxication and its Aftermath

1 month

10.


Frankenstein in Baghdad

1 month

 

We sent both Jennifer Egan’s Manhattan Beach and Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere to our Hall of Fame this month. It’s the second time Egan has attained this honor – her last novel A Visit from the Goon Squad reached the Hall in 2011. Egan joins twelve other authors who’ve had two works ascend to our Hall of Fame, and if the current pace holds true we can expect her third book to reach some time in 2025. If you’re keeping track at home, we’ve now had thirteen authors send two books to our list; four have sent three; and then David Mitchell has sent four.

The rest of our list shifted up the ranks accordingly. Carmen Maria Machado’s Her Body and Other Parties moved from third to second position; John McPhee’s Draft No. 4 from fourth to third. You get the idea.

Two very different books fill the open spots on this month’s list.

Occupying ninth position is The Recovering, Leslie Jamison’s sweeping exploration of addiction and those who grapple with it. The hefty volume was recently hailed by Michael Bourne as “a welcome corrective to the popular image of addiction as a gritty battle for the addict’s soul and recovery as a heroic feat of derring-do.” He noted that Jamison’s gifts are on display, and that the book “shimmers throughout.” However Bourne was not without some criticism. The work could’ve used more “ruthless editing,” and “there is little in The Recovering that wouldn’t be twice as compelling in a book half as long,” Bourne wrote.

Ahmed Saadawi’s Frankenstein in Baghdad claimed the tenth spot after several months among the near misses. The book, which was translated for English readers by Jonathan Wright, was recently shortlisted for this year’s Man Booker Prize. (While on the topic of honorifics, it had previously made an appearance on Lydia Kiesling’s Year in Reading.) In our Great 2018 Book Preview, I looked ahead to Saadawi’s latest:
The long-awaited English translation of the winner of the International Prize for Arabic Fiction in 2014 gives American readers the opportunity to read Saadawi’s haunting, bleak, and darkly comic take on Iraqi life in 2008. Or, as Saadawi himself put it in interview for Arab Lit, he set out to write “the fictional representation of the process of everyone killing everyone.”
This month’s other near misses included: LessAn American MarriageThe Odyssey, The World Goes On, and The Overstory. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: March 2018

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for March.

Looking for additional book recommendations? One of the benefits of subscribing to The Millions is access to our exclusive monthly newsletter in which our venerable staffers let you know what they’re reading right now. Learn more here.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
1.

5 Year Diary
4 months

2.
2.

Manhattan Beach
6 months

3.
3.

Her Body and Other Parties
4 months

4.
4.

Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process

5 months

5.
5.

Fire Sermon
3 months

6.
6.

Little Fires Everywhere

6 months

7.
10.

The Immortalists
2 months

8.
7.

Sing, Unburied, Sing

4 months

9.
8.

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden

3 months

10.
9.

My Favorite Thing is Monsters

3 months

 

This month brought nothing new to our list and the top half remains unchanged. The first six titles from February are also the first six titles for March. Mercifully, titles seven, eight, nine, and ten switched places, which gives me enough material to write at least this single sentence.

Most of this month’s near misses carried over from February as well. The lone newcomer is Tayari Jones’s An American Marriage. In our Great 2018 Book Preview, our own Nick Ripatrazone observed that, “In our greatest tragedies, there is the feeling of no escape—and when the storytelling is just right, we feel consumed by the heartbreak.” He highlighted Jones’s “powerful new novel” as an example of this feat, stating that despite the book’s tragic turns of plot, its author “makes sure … we can’t look away.”

Next month at least two spots will open up after Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere and Jennifer Egan’s Manhattan Beach graduate to our Hall of Fame. Which books will take their places? Will they be new releases or some of the near misses from our previous lists? There’s only one way to find out.

In the meantime, those looking for recommendations on what to read should consider subscribing to our monthly “What We’re Reading” round-up, which is sent to Millions supporters. You can learn more about the (extremely affordable!) program over here. In recent months, these round-up emails have featured Hannah Gersen on Future Sex, Iľja Rákoš on Penguin Lost, and yours truly on The Trees The TreesShelter, and It to name just a few. The round-ups provide quick, snapshot book recommendations from Millions staffers and special guests which serve as digital recreations of the staff picks shelf stickers at your favorite bookstore. In the past four months, I’ve added at least a dozen books to my “to read” pile thanks to them.

This month’s other near misses included: The OdysseyFrankenstein in BaghdadBelladonnaDon’t Save Anything, and An American Marriage. See Also: Last month’s list.

2018 Hugo Awards Finalists

The Hugo Awards announced their 2018 finalists on Friday. Administered by the World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), the Hugo Awards are “science fiction’s most prestigious award.” Below is a selection of finalists (here’s the full list):


Best Novel
The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi
New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson
Provenance by Ann Leckie
Raven Stratagem by Yoon Ha Lee
Six Wakes by Mur Lafferty
The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin (Read The Millions’ on Jemisin)

Best Novella
All Systems Red by Martha Wells
And Then There Were (N-One)” by Sarah Pinsker
Binti: Home by Nnedi Okorafor (An essay on aliens in literature)
The Black Tides of Heaven by JY Yang
Down Among the Sticks and Bones by Seanan McGuire
River of Teeth by Sarah Gailey

Best Graphic Story
Bitch Planet, Volume 2: President Bitch by Kelly Sue DeConnick (writing); Valentine De Landro and Taki Soma (illustration); Kelly Fitzpatrick (coloring); and Clayton Cowles (lettering) | (the series was featured in our 2016 Year in Reading)
Black Bolt, Volume 1: Hard Time by Saladin Ahmed (writing), Christian Ward (illustration), and Clayton Cowles (lettering)
Monstress, Volume 2: The Blood by Marjorie M. Liu (writing) and Sana Takeda (illustration)My Favorite Thing is Monsters by Emil Ferris (writing and illustration) | (our own Emily St. John Mandel read it in 2017)
Paper Girls, Volume 3 by Brian K. Vaughan (writing), Cliff Chiang (illustration), Matthew Wilson (coloring), and Jared Fletcher (lettering)
Saga, Volume 7 by Brian K. Vaughan (writing) and Fiona Staples (illustration)

The awards will be announced at Worldcon 76 on August 19, 2018.

The Millions Top Ten: February 2018

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for February.

Looking for additional book recommendations? One of the benefits of subscribing to The Millions is access to our exclusive monthly newsletter in which our venerable staffers let you know what they’re reading right now. Learn more here.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
1.

5 Year Diary
3 months

2.
2.

Manhattan Beach
5 months

3.
3.

Her Body and Other Parties
3 months

4.
4.

Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process

4 months

5.
5.

Fire Sermon
2 months

6.
8.

Little Fires Everywhere

5 months

7.
7.

Sing, Unburied, Sing
3 months

8.
10.

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden

2 months

9.
9.

My Favorite Thing is Monsters

2 months

10.


The Immortalists

1 month

 

This month, the top half of our list is the same as it was last month. In fact, most of the list is the same as it was last month. What is it about February? Three years ago, we had the same thing happen, and I wound up calculating Shaquille O’Neal’s height in stacked books. It was as if I had been possessed by Harper’s “Findings” section.

But one person’s boredom is really another person’s consistency, and there is comfort in steadiness. On our list this month, the top half remains unchanged, but slight jostling occurred in the bottom. Two books graduated to our Hall of Fame: Victor LaValle’s The Changeling and Laurent Binet’s The Seventh Function of Language.

Emil Ferris’s My Favorite Thing is Monsters fills one of the open spaces this month. Ferris’s fictional graphic diary had previously debuted on our December 2017 list, but dropped out last month, and is back again today. At that pace, look for it to reach our Hall of Fame around Thanksgiving. In her Year in Reading entry two months ago, Emily St. John Mandel said Ferris’s book “pierced [her] haze of unhappiness” and imparted “the sense of having encountered something truly extraordinary.” She raved, “Sometimes you read a book and you think, Oh. This is what a book can be.”

The other opening on this month’s list was claimed by Chloe Benjamin’s The Immortalists. In our Great 2018 Book Preview, Janet Potter previewed Benjamin’s second novel by saying it sounded so good that she’d have to “break [her] no-novels-about-New-Yorkers rule for this one.”

This month’s other near misses included: The OdysseyDon’t Save AnythingBelladonnaMy Absolute Darling, and Frankenstein in Baghdad. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: December 2017

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for December.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.


5 Year Diary
1 month

2.
1.

Manhattan Beach
3 months

3.


Her Body and Other Parties
1 month

4.


Sing, Unburied, Sing
1 month

5.
6.

Little Fires Everywhere
3 months

6.
5.

The Seventh Function of Language: A Novel

5 months

7.
3.

Exit West
6 months

8.
8.

Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process

2 months

9.
2.

The Changeling

5 months

10.


My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

1 month

 

A Millions first: the top spot this month belongs to a book of blank pages. Is this an indictment of the modern publishing industry? Or are Millions readers a bunch of obsessive diarists who gleefully read Hannah Gersen’s Gift Guide for Readers and Writers? I’m thinking the latter because reading Gersen’s recommendation has my index finger hovering over the “buy now” button:
The design is unique in that every page represents one day and is divided into five parts, with each part representing one year. So, when you write your entry for Feb 1, you can look back at Feb 1 of the previous year to see what you were doing/writing/reading/thinking/weathering. I think it’s especially useful for writers because if you use the space to track writing and reading projects (as I often do), it’s a great way to gauge your long-term progress.
Elsewhere, there were major shakeups on our list owing to the success of our Year in Reading series, which recently wrapped up. As our series unfolds each year, one or two books become unmissable fixtures on our participants’ lists. You can’t open a contributor’s piece without seeing these books listed. Years ago, such was the case with John Jeremiah Sullivan’s Pulphead, which was praised by almost every Millions staffer, including Elizabeth MinkelBill Morris, and Garth Risk Hallberg. More recently in 2014, Jenny Offill’s Dept. of Speculation was shouted out by five participants.

This year, that honor belongs to Carmen Maria Machado’s Her Body and Other Parties, which skyrocketed into third position this month on the strength of recommendations from six participants – including Louise Erdrich, Lidia Yuknavitch, and Jeff VanderMeer. Maria Machado’s story collection is unlike anything else published this year. Her unsettling stories play with form and genre, weaving disparate influences together into unique threads. (One of my favorites in the collection reads like a blend of Susan Minot’s “Lust” and Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend.) Are these stories horror? Fairy tale? That’s an argument for another piece. The takeaway here, as evidenced by our Year in Reading participants and our Millions readers alike is simple: the book is excellent. (Bonus: Carmen Maria Machado shared her own Year In Reading this year, too.)

Another book benefitting from last month’s series was Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward. Also highlighted by six Year in Reading participants, Ward’s novel now holds fourth position on our Top Ten. (Bonus: Jesmyn Ward shared her own Year in Reading this year, too.)

Finally, a note on what’s absent. Obviously, no books ascended to our Hall of Fame this month. Instead, the new titles on our list unseated books which hung around the Top Ten for the past few months. Those dropped books include Forest Dark and My Absolute Darling. Next month, will they pull their way back up onto our list? Let’s find out soon.

See Also: Last month’s list.

A Year in Reading: Emily St. John Mandel

I’ve had a good year in reading, mostly because I’ve been traveling a lot and have developed a habit of reading obsessively in airports and airplanes. In January I read Josephine Rowe’s debut novel, A Loving, Faithful Animal, and Robert Seethaler’s A Whole Life, and was deeply moved by both. Both are little marvels of elegance and concision.

Three of the five books I read in February warranted a little star next to the title in the notebook where I keep track of books I’ve read. Javier Marías’s A Heart So White is essentially a ghost story, except that thing that’s haunted isn’t a house or a landscape or even particularly a person; the thing that’s haunted is somehow the entire institution of marriage, and I’m still unsettled by the thought of it. I think that Ali Smith’s Autumn is her best work to date, and I’ve loved almost all of them. Autumn is utterly of this era, the first post-Brexit novel I’ve read, and yet I think it has a rare quality of timelessness, in that I am certain I’ll still find it moving and fascinating 20 years from now. Dan Chaon’s Ill Will is the creepiest book I’ve ever read, and I mean that as a compliment. It’s the kind of book that grabs you by the throat.

My favorite book of March was Sarah Manguso’s 300 Arguments. It’s slim and deadly. Her idea was that it might be interesting to write a book comprised solely of the quotable sentences that one underlines in more ordinary books. I found this book quite useful. When one of my European publishers sent me a proposed jacket image over the summer that involved a young woman strutting down a post-apocalyptic road with a come-hither look, dressed in a bustier and form-fitting jean shorts, I sent them this section from 300 Arguments:
After I submitted the final draft of my book about a train-track suicide, the art department produced sketches for my book cover: a needle and a long skein of red thread; a length of fluffy pinkish lace; a yellow hand mirror lying on a patch of green grass. I gave my editor a note for the designers, and the next day they delivered a perfect cover design: a photograph of the book’s subject, a man sitting on a train. This was the note: Pretend this book was written by a man.

(My publisher responded with the same jacket image, except with the girl Photoshopped out, so that the image was just an empty landscape. Fine.)

In April I read and loved Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans. I don’t read much YA, but we were about to do an event together and it was a rare moment where I was a) doing an event with another author and b) actually had time to read said author’s book. It’s a devastating and beautifully written book. The imagery stays with me.

My favorite book of May was Adam Johnson’s short story collection Fortune Smiles, which includes one of the best ghost stories I’ve ever read. I spent a pleasurable July reading everything ever published by Nicole Krauss, in order to familiarize myself with her body of work before I reviewed her spectacular Forest Dark for the Guardian. August was unremarkable, book-wise, but in September I read Nick Harkaway’s wonderful Gnomon, and then James Smythe’s gorgeous and haunting I Still Dream the month after that. Gnomon and I Still Dream are in an AI-paranoia genre that I’ve been seeing more and more frequently, with plots wherein the nature of reality is slippery.

As I write this, November isn’t over yet, but the books that have most impressed me this month are Shirley Jackson’s Hangsaman and Brit Bennett’s The Mothers. The novels are in no way similar, except in their authors’ impeccable control over their material.

I’ve saved June for last, because in June I read Emil Ferris’s My Favorite Thing Is Monsters. I encountered the book in Montreal. I go to Montreal only under duress or when I think it will be especially helpful to my Quebec publisher, because I lived there 15 years ago, and living in that city as an Anglophone was so unpleasant that I fall into an automatic depression every time I return. People are nice to me now when I go there, no one spits at me on the street for speaking English the way that one guy did 15 years ago, I no longer see anti-English graffiti on the street, I speak French well enough now to order a coffee en français and therefore other customers in line don’t glare at me, I no longer have the kind of job where I need to worry about the Language Police, and I care much less about whether or not people like me than I did when I was 23, but one’s first impression of a place can be indelible.

In the spring I was in Montreal for 24 hours, and at the hotel between interviews, my Quebec publisher showed me a book that pierced my haze of unhappiness: My Favorite Thing Is Monsters is a dazzling graphic novel, a story about growing up poor in 1960s Chicago that’s also a Weimar Republic horror story and a meditation on monsters, on what it means to be different, on family and love. “This book will change the genre,” my publisher said, and I don’t know enough about the graphic novel genre to confirm or deny this, but I do know that the book changed me. I left the city with the sense of having encountered something truly extraordinary. Sometimes you read a book and you think, Oh. This is what a book can be.

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