Man Booker Prize Names 2019 Shortlist

The 2019 Man Booker Prize shortlist is here!

The literary prize, among the most prestigious of its kind, aims “to promote the finest in fiction by rewarding the best novel of the year written in English and published in the United Kingdom.” (Feel free to brush up on the longlist before diving into the shortlist below.)

Announced during a press conference at London’s British Library, 2019 Chair of Judges Peter Florence said: “We have a shortlist of six extraordinary books and we could make a case for each of them as winner, but I want to toast all of them as ‘winners.’ Anyone who reads all six of these books would be enriched and delighted, would be awe-struck by the power of story, and encouraged by what literature can do to set our imaginations free.”

This year’s shortlist includes former winner and six-time nominee, Margaret Atwood, for her heavily guarded sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale (out next Tuesday!); former winner Salman Rushdie; Lucy Ellmann for an experimental 1,000-page monologue; British novelist Bernardine Evaristo; our own Chigozie Obioma, who was a 2015 finalist; and Turkish novelist Elif Shafak.

Here’s the 2019 Man Booker shortlist (and applicable bonus links):


The Testaments by Margaret Atwood (Read our 2015 interview with Atwood)
Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellmann
Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo
An Orchestra of Minorities by Chigozie Obioma (Read our interview with Obioma)
Quichotte by Salman Rushdie (Read a recent profile of Rushdie)
10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak 

The Man Booker Prize winner will be announced on October 14 at a ceremony in London.

Center for Fiction Names 2019 First Novel Prize Longlist

The Center for Fiction announced its 2019 First Novel Prize Longlist yesterday. The award is given to the “best debut novel published between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31 of the award year,” and the prize-winning author receives $10,000.

Here is the 2019 longlist (featuring many titles from our 2019 Book Preview) with bonus links when applicable:

The Affairs of the Falcóns by Melissa Rivero (Featured in our April Preview)

American Spy by Lauren Wilkinson (Read Wilkinson’s 2018 Year in Reading)

Bangkok Wakes to Rain by Pitchaya Sudbanthad (Read Sudbanthad’s 2018 Year in Reading)

The Bobcat by Katherine Forbes Riley

The Dearly Beloved by Cara Wall 

Disappearing Earth by Julia Phillips 

The Falconer by Dana Czapnik 

Fall Back Down When I Die by Joe Wilkins 

The Farm by Joanne Ramos 

Goodnight Stranger by Miciah Bay Gault 

The History of Living Forever by Jake Wolff 

In West Mills by De’Shawn Charles Winslow (Featured in our June Preview)

The Gone Dead by Chanelle Benz 

The Most Fun We Ever Had by Claire Lombardo


 

The Old Drift by Namwali Serpell (Read our interview with Serpell)

On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong (Featured in two Year in Reading posts)

Oval by Elvia Wilk (Featured in our June Preview)

The Paper Wasp by Lauren Acampora 

A Particular Kind of Black Man by Tope Folarin 

A Prayer for Travelers by Ruchika Tomar 

A People’s History of Heaven by Mathangi Subramanian 

Riots I Have Known by Ryan Chapman (Read an excerpt here)

Tears of the Trufflepig by Fernando A. Flores 

Tinfoil Butterfly by Rachel Eve Moulton 

The Unpassing by Chia-Chia Lin (Featured in Julia Phillips’ list of eight books set in the middle of nowhere)

The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates 

We Cast a Shadow by Maurice Carlos Ruffin 

The 2019 shortlist will be announced in September, and the winner will be announced at The Center for Fiction’s annual Benefit and Awards Dinner in December.

Man Booker Prize Names 2019 Longlist

The Man Booker Prize, which “aims to promote the finest in fiction by rewarding the best novel of the year written in English and published in the United Kingdom,” announced its 2019 longlist.

Whittled down from 151 novels published in the U.K. or Ireland between Oct. 1, 2018 and Sept. 30, 2019, the 13-title longlist includes two previous winners (Salman Rushdie and Margaret Atwood), one American author (Lucy Ellmann), and one debut novelist (Oyinkan Braithwaite). We are also extremely excited that our own contributing editor Chigozie Obioma made the list!

Here’s the 2019 “Booker Dozen,” featuring 13 novels—plus applicable bonus links:


The Testaments by Margaret Atwood (Read our 2015 interview with Atwood)
Night Boat to Tangier by Kevin Barry (Read Barry’s 2017 Year in Reading entry)
My Sister, The Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (Featured in our November Most Anticipated List)
Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellmann
Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo
The Wall by John Lanchester
The Man Who Saw Everything by Deborah Levy (Featured in our Great Second-Half Book Preview)
Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli (Read reviews of Luiselli’s other works here and here)
An Orchestra of Minorities by Chigozie Obioma (Our interview with Obioma)
Lanny by Max Porter (Read our review of Lanny)
Quichotte by Salman Rushdie
10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak 
Frankissstein by Jeanette Winterson

The Man Booker Prize shortlist will be announced on Sept. 3rd.

Tayari Jones Wins 2019 Women’s Prize for Fiction

Tayari Jones won the 2019 Women’s Prize for Fiction for her novel An American Marriage.Jones also won the Aspen Words Literary Prize this year, and beat out two Booker Prize winners for the award. Kate Williams, chair of judges for the Women’s Prize, said of An American Marriage: “This is an exquisitely intimate portrait of a marriage shattered by racial injustice. It is a story of love, loss and loyalty, the resilience of the human spirit painted on a big political canvas—that shines a light on today’s America. We all loved this brilliant book.”

Formerly the Orange Prize and Baileys Prize, the Women’s Prize for Fiction recognizes the best English-language novel by a woman published in the U.K. in the previous year. The £30,000 prize celebrates “excellence, originality and accessibility in women’s writing from throughout the world.” It is the U.K.’s only literary prize for fiction by women. Bonus Link: Our quick guide to the 2019 Women’s Prize shortlist—it’s never too late to read the other nominees!

Lambda Literary Awards Names 2019 Winners

The Lambda Literary Awards named its 2019 winners in a ceremony last night in New York City. The annual award, now in its 31st year, celebrates the “best lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender books of the year and affirm[s] that LGBTQ stories are part of the literature of the world.”

In addition to the category awards, Lambda’s Trustee and Visionary Awards were given to Alexander Chee and Masha Gessen.

The winners of the 2019 Lambda Literary Awards were announced in 24 categories. Here are some highlights:

Lesbian FictionThe Tiger Flu by Larissa Lai

Gay FictionJonny Appleseed by Joshua WhiteheadBisexual FictionDisoriental by Négar Djavadi and translated by Tina Kover (One of our Most Anticipated titles from 2018)

Transgender FictionLittle Fish by Casey PlettLGBTQ NonfictionLooking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry by Imani Perry (A “must read” according to Well-Read Black Girl’s Glory Edim)

Bisexual NonfictionOut of Step: A Memoir by Anthony Moll

Transgender NonfictionHistory of the Transgender Child by Julian Gill-PetersonLesbian Memoir/BiographyChronology by Zahra PattersonGay Memoir/BiographyNo Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black and Free in America by Darnell L. Moore

Graphic NovelThe Lie and How We Told It by Tommi Parrish

Lesbian PoetryEach Tree Could Hold a Noose or a House by Nina Puro

Gay PoetryIndecency by Justin Phillip Reed (One of Nick Ripatrazone’s Poems That End with Questions)

Bisexual PoetryWe Play a Game by Duy DoanTransgender PoetryLo Terciaro / The Tertiary by Raquel Salas Rivera (Described as “artful” by Ada Limón in her 2018 Year in Reading post)

The full list of winners can be found here.

And the Winners of the 2019 Best Translated Book Awards Are…

The 2019 Best Translated Book Awards were given to Slave Old Man and Of Death. Minimal Odes this evening at a ceremony at the New York Rights Fair in Manhattan.

Slave Old Man, written by Patrick Chamoiseau, translated by Linda Coverdale, and published by The New Press, won for fiction. Of Death. Minimal Odes, written by Hilda Hilst, translated by Laura Cesarco Eglin, and published by co-im-press, took the prize for poetry.

Slave Old Man is translated from the French and Creole. It is the first BTBA win for a book from the French. It is also the first victory for an author from Martinique.

Of Death. Minimal Odes is translated from the Portuguese. It is the second time poetry from Brazil has claimed the prize, after Rilke Shake won the 2016 award.

It is the first victory for both translators, and for The New Press and co-im-press. Linda Coverdale and The New Press were previously finalists for Jean Echenoz’s The Lightning.

Here is the jury’s statement on Slave Old Man:
In turns biblical and mythical, Patrick Chamoiseau’s Slave Old Man is a powerful reckoning with the agonies of the past and their persistence into the present. It is a modern epic, a history of the Caribbean, and a tribute to Creole languages, all told through the story of one slave old man. Linda Coverdale’s translation sings as she beautifully renders language as lush and vividly alive as the wilderness the old man plunges into in his flight to freedom. It is dreamy yet methodical prose, vivid, sensual but also a touch strange, forcing you to slow down and reread. Thoughtful, considered footnotes provide added context and explanation, enriching the reader’s understanding of this powerful and subversive work of genius by a master storyteller. Slave Old Man is a thunderclap of a novel. His rich language, brilliant in Coverdale’s English, evokes the underground forces of resistance that carry the slave old man away. It’s a novel for fugitives, and for the future.
And here’s the jury statement on Of Death. Minimal Odes:
The first collection of Hilda Hilst’s poetry to be appear in English, Of Death. Minimal Odes is masterfully translated by Laura Cesarco Eglin. Hilda Hilst’s odes are searing, tender blasphemies. One is drawn to Of Death in the way we’re drawn to things that might be dangerous. These are poems that lure readers well beyond their best interests, regardless of whatever scars might be sustained. In language that is twisted, animalistic, yet at times plain, Eglin reveals another layer in the work of this Brazilian great.
The fiction jury included Pierce Alquist (BookRiot), Caitlin L. Baker (Island Books), Kasia Bartoszyńska (Monmouth College), Tara Cheesman (freelance book critic), George Carroll (litintranslation.com), Adam Hetherington (reader), Keaton Patterson (Brazos Bookstore), Sofia Samatar (writer), Elijah Watson (A Room of One’s Own). The poetry jury included Jarrod Annis (Greenlight Bookstore), Katrine Øgaard Jensen (EuropeNow), Tess Lewis (writer and translator), Aditi Machado (poet and translator), and Laura Marris (writer and translator).

We announced the longlists and finalists here at the site earlier this spring.

Thanks to grant funds from the Amazon Literary Partnership, the living winning author and the translators will each receive $2,000 cash prizes. Three Percent at the University of Rochester founded the BTBAs in 2008, and since then, the Amazon Literary Partnership has contributed more than $150,000 to international authors and their translators through the BTBA. For more information, visit the official Best Translated Book Award site and the official BTBA Facebook page, and follow the award on Twitter. 

‘Celestial Bodies’ Wins the Man Booker International Prize

Celestial Bodies, written by Jokha Alharthi and translated from the Arabic by Marilyn Booth, won the 2019 Man Booker International Prize. The prize awards £50,000 to the best works of translated fiction from around the world, with prize money split evenly between translator and author. Alkharthi is the first female Omani novelist to be translated into English, and the first author from the Arabian Gulf to win the Man Booker International. Bettany Hughes, who chaired the panel of five judges, said of the novel, “Its delicate artistry draws us into a richly imagined community—opening out to tackle profound questions of time and mortality and disturbing aspects of our shared history. The style is a metaphor for the subject, subtly resisting clichés of race, slavery and gender. The translation is precise and lyrical, weaving in the cadences of both poetry and everyday speech.Celestial Bodies evokes the forces that constrain us and those that set us free.”

Best Translated Book Awards Names 2019 Finalists

The Best Translated Books Awards today named its 2019 finalists for fiction and poetry. The award, founded by Three Percent at the University of Rochester, comes with $10,000 in prizes from the Amazon Literary Partnership.

In the past seven years, the ALP has contributed more than $150,000 to international authors and their translators through the BTBA.

This year’s BTBA finalists are as follows—and be sure to check out this year’s fiction and poetry longlists, which we announced last month.

Fiction Finalists

Congo Inc.: Bismarck’s Testament by In Koli Jean Bofane, translated from the French by Marjolijn de Jager (Democratic Republic of Congo, Indiana University Press) 

The Hospital by Ahmed Bouanani, translated from the French by Lara Vergnaud (Morocco, New Directions)

Slave Old Man by Patrick Chamoiseau, translated from the French by Linda Coverdale (Martinique, New Press)

Pretty Things by Virginie Despentes, translated from the French by Emma Ramadan, (France, Feminist Press)

Moon Brow by Shahriar Mandanipour, translated from the Persian by Khalili Sara (Iran, Restless Books)

Bricks and Mortar by Clemens Meyer, translated from the German by Katy Derbyshire (Germany, Fitzcarraldo Editions)

Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata, translated from the Japanese by Ginny Tapley Takemori (Japan, Grove)

The Governesses by Anne Serre, translated from the French by Mark Hutchinson (France, New Directions)

Öræfï by Ófeigur Sigurðsson, translated from the Icelandic by Lytton Smith (Iceland, Deep Vellum)

Fox by Dubravka Ugresic, translated from the Croatian by Ellen Elias-Bursac and David Williams (Croatia, Open Letter)

Poetry Finalists

The Future Has an Appointment with the Dawn by Tanella Boni, translated from the French by Todd Fredson (Cote D’Ivoire, University of Nebraska)

Moss & Silver by Jure Detela, translated from the Slovenian by Raymond Miller and Tatjana Jamnik (Slovenia, Ugly Duckling)

Of Death. Minimal Odes by Hilda Hilst, translated from the Portuguese by Laura Cesarco Eglin (Brazil, co-im-press)

Autobiography of Death by Kim Hyesoon, translated from the Korean by Don Mee Choi(Korea, New Directions)

Negative Space by Luljeta Lleshanaku, translated from the Albanian by Ani Gjika (Albania, New Directions)

The winners will be announced on Wednesday, May 29 as part of the New York Rights Fair.

Aida Edemariam Wins 2019 RSL Ondaatje Prize

The Royal Society of Literature today named Aida Edemariam the winner of the 2019 RSL Ondaatje Prize for The Wife’s Tale, a work that blends memoir, fiction, and poetry and is based on the life of her nonagenarian grandmother. The annual prize, now in its 15th year, awards £10,000 to a work of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry for “evoking the spirit of a place.”

Judge Michèle Roberts said of the winning book, “The Wife’s Tale is beautifully written, carefully researched and richly imagined, an exquisite blend of memoir, fiction, poetry and invocation. This is a book I shall constantly re-read as well as recommend to everyone i know who loves literature.”

Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi Wins 2019 PEN/Faulkner Prize

Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi was awarded the 2019 PEN/Faulkner Prize for her novel, Call Me Zebra. This year’s judges, Percival Everett, Ernesto Quiñonez, and Joy Williams, said of the winning title: “Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi’s Call Me Zebra is a library within a library, a Borges-esque labyrinth of references from all cultures and all walks of life. In today’s visual Netflix world, Ms. Van der Vliet Oloomi’s novel performs at the highest of levels in accomplishing only what the written novel can show us.” (For more, check out our review of Call Me Zebra.)The prize—which selects the best works by American citizens published in the last calendar year—has the distinction of being America’s largest peer-juried contest for fiction. The award brings with it a $15,000 prize for the winner, and $5,000 for each of the four finalists.