The End of California

New Price: $23.95
Used Price: $4.90

Mentioned in:

A Year in Reading: Emerging Writers

The indefatigable Dan Wickett is the hardest working man in book blogging. He is a tireless advocate for "emerging" writers, small presses, and literary journals. How he found the time to compile this post for us, I'll never know, but I'm glad he did.I divided my thoughts about authors that I read in 2006 into three categories. First up would be (what else from my end) Emerging Writers. Writers that fell into that category that I can't wait to read more of would have to include:Dag Solstad - His Shyness & Dignity is not his first novel, but it is the first available in English, and it was the best book I read all year. Graywolf Press took the chance on bringing this Norwegian's work to those of us without the skills to read his books in their original language, and they should be thanked.Benjamin Percy - His debut story collection, The Language of Elk, was published by Carnegie Mellon University Press in the middle of the year and shows readers a new vision of the current west, with most of the stories set in Oregon. Percy's language crackles with masculinity and humor and the bizarre. Watch for him - he put a story in both BASS and Pushcart this year, has one coming in January's Esquire and his second collection is coming from Graywolf Press in 2007.Robert Fanning - Are you kidding me? Wickett lobbed a poet into this list? Absolutely. Fanning's The Seed Thieves is his first full length collection of poetry, thanks to Marick Press, and it is beyond just being solid. Fanning has a fantastic way about his phrasing and observations that work both on page, and if you are fortunate enough to have the opportunity to hear him read his work.Second up would be those writers who I already thought pretty highly of, that confirmed for me, once again, just how talented they were:William Gay with his novel Twilight from MacAdam/Cage. He follows up his previous two novels and short story collection with possibly his best yet. A frighteningly gothic near fairy tale about a young brother and sister combination and their efforts to expose a rather sordid mortician.Daniel Woodrell and Winter's Bone, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie with Half of a Yellow Sun. Anybody reading this far into Max's post has probably visited my site. Enough said as I'm pretty sure searching my blog for 2006 will show these two names and titles coming up way more than anything else.Tom Franklin with Smonk. The fever Franklin had that induced this story to come oozing out must have been 104 plus.Steve Yarbrough and Ron Rash with The End of California and The World Made Straight, respectively. These two gentlemen deserve accolades for not writing with any flash, or verbal pyrotechnics, but instead delivering captivating novels, time and time again by simply telling a great story, and doing so with, while excellent writing, not the need to make you notice it.Michael Ruhlman has once again delivered a fantastic book about cooking with his The Reach of a Chef. If you have ANY interest in the art of cooking, his books are all a must. And even if you don't, you have more than half a chance at becoming enthralled anyway.Charles D'Ambrosio and Lee K. Abbott just may be the two best short story writers around and readers were fortunate enough to enjoy a new collection by D'Ambrosio (The Dead Fish Museum) and a Collected collection of Abbott (All Things, All at Once). There isn't a mis-step in either, and above and beyond that, there are probably close to a dozen stories between the two works that are prize winning, year end anthology worthy.Lastly would be those writers that I found myself embarrassed to realize I'd never read their work prior to 2006, and in many cases had not even heard of them:Colson Whitehead - I had the opportunity to see him read in Ann Arbor earlier in the year and bought a copy of The Intuitionist, which I promptly read and loved. His other three books are high up in my TBR pile.Magnus Mills - I don't know why I bought his The Restraint of Beasts - I thought I remembered his name from Jeff Bryant's Underrated Writers Project from last year, but his name is not there. Whatever the case - I loved it and the follow up novel, All Quiet on the Orient Express as well. The rest of his novels and a short story collection reside in my TBR pile at this time.Rupert Thomson - Thanks to Megan for nominating his latest, Divided Kingdom, as an LBC nominee. Another one who I immediately began looking for his backlog of many novels to pad my TBR pile.Richard Powers - Oh well, at least I waited for a decent book to hop aboard - The Echo Maker - NBA winner. Thanks to Ed Champion for inviting me to the roundtable discussion of this wonderful title. There's approximately 2100 pages of unread Powers' novels on a shelf here now.Peter Markus - Even more ridiculous when you find out he resides less than 30 minutes from my house. Went to see the aforementioned Robert Fanning read earlier this year and Markus read some unpublished work from what should be his fourth book of short fictions that deal with brothers, mud, fish, and the moon. He was kind enough to give me a copy of his first, Good, Brother, which was reprinted by Calimari Press earlier this year. I read it that night and had ordered both The Moon is a Lighthouse (from a store in Japan - the only one I could find online) and The Singing Fish (also published, last year, by Calimari Press). The man is a unique writer, an amazing writer, and one I highly recommend you try to find. Plenty of his work is available online.Thanks Dan!

The People’s Act of Love by James Meek: A Review

A few of the twentieth century Russian history books that I've read have touched on a detachment of Czech soldiers who were stranded in Russia after World War I. The Bolshevik Revolution soon followed and the soldiers remained stranded, thousands of miles from home. The soldiers who numbered as many as 40,000 and were stretched out along the length of the Trans-Siberian were, according to John Keegan in his history of World War I under the sway of an anti-Bolshevik officer and were "both in a position and soon in a mood to deny the use of the railway to anyone else." In his novel, The People's Act of Love, James Meek drops into to the town of Yazyk amongst a stranded group of these Czech soldiers. In a book of many protagonists, the point of view of Lieutenant Mutz, one of those Czech soldiers, is the most reliable. Mutz, who mostly wants to return home after years in Siberia is surrounded by a collection of eccentrics. Anna Petrovna, the woman who Mutz would like to escape with, is restive and noncommittal. Mutz's boss Matula is a vicious young man drunk on the power he wields over the small backwater that his soldiers occupy. Yazyk is also home to mystical sect of castrati who lurk through the town like ghosts. But the catalyst for much the book's action is Samarin, an escaped prisoner who claims he is being chased by a cannibal. Meek ably handles these characters and many others as he crafts a story that feels both otherworldly and historically accurate. The novel was longlisted for the Booker and is engagingly dense and action-filled - worthwhile for any reader but a must for anyone interested in Russian literature or history. Meek himself is not Russian. He's British, formerly a journalist, the Guardian's Moscow correspondent for many years.

Most Anticipated Books of 2006

I decided to put together a list of the "most anticipated" books coming out this year (as I did last year, in a somewhat different form). I had no idea that there would be so many big name authors. Pretty exciting. If there's anything you think I missed, please leave it for us in the comments. Happy reading in 2006!Coming Soon or Already Here:Brooklyn Follies by Paul Auster (NY Times review)Arthur and George by Julian Barnes (Booker shortlisted, NY Times review)Company by Max Barry (author blog)Utterly Monkey by Nick Laird (Zadie Smith's husband, Kakutani's review)The Accidental by Ali Smith (Booker shortlisted)Correcting the Landscape by Marjorie Cole (Thanks Laurie)February:Intuition by Allegra Goodman (PW Review)A Family Daughter by Maile Meloy (excerpt)The Brief History of the Dead by Kevin Brockmeier (thanks Gwenda)The Best People in the World by Justin Tussing (thanks Dan)March:Apex Hides the Hurt by Colson Whitehead (A "Face to Watch")River of Gods by Ian McDonald (Thanks Laurie)The Night Watch by Sarah Waters (thanks CAAF)Abide with Me by Elizabeth Strout (thanks Cliff)April:The Dead Fish Museum by Charles D'Ambrosio (EWN interview)This Book Will Save Your Life by A.M. Homes (#2 on Stephen King's list)Black Swan Green by David Mitchell (interview)Seeing by Jose Saramago (Nobel Laureate)Adverbs by Daniel Handler AKA Lemony Snicket (interview)The World Made Straight by Ron Rash (thanks Dan)May:Theft by Peter Carey (Carey is a two-time Booker winner)The Possibility of an Island by Michel Houellebecq (Guardian review)Everyman by Philip Roth (Guardian interview)Absurdistan by Gary Shteyngart (interview)The Man of My Dreams by Curtis Sittenfeld (synopsis)Ludmila's Broken English by DBC PierrejPod by Douglas Coupland (sequel to Microserfs, an evening with Coupland)June:Terrorist by John Updike (Reuters preview)Alentejo Blue by Monica AliIn Persuasion Nation by George Saunders (interview)The End of California by Steve Yarbrough (Thanks Dan)July:Gallatin Canyon by Thomas McGuane (New Yorker interview)Talk Talk by T.C. Boyle (Boyle's blog)August:Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman by Haruki Murakami (list of stories)Winter's Bone by Daniel Woodrell (Thanks Dan)Brief Encounters with Che Guevara by Ben Fountain (thanks Stephan)October:One Good Turn by Kate Atkinson (sequel to Case Histories)A small sampling of other 2006 previews: Boston Globe, Portland Phoenix, The Australian, Guardian.Addenda: Books suggested in the comments are being added above.
Surprise Me!

BROWSE BY AUTHOR