Panel Mania: ‘The 500 Years of Indigenous Resistance Comic Book’

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Originally published in 2010 in black and white, Arsenal Pulp will issue a revised and expanded edition of The 500 Years of Indigenous Resistance Comic Book, written and drawn by Gord Hill, who has added nearly 60 pages of new material and redrew much of the book.

Hill is a member of the Kwakwaka’wakw nation and has worked in support of Indigenous peoples for years. The revised edition begins in the 15th century, with the Spanish invaders and Christopher Columbus, and continues into the present day, with current battles around the Dakota Access pipeline.

The book documents the horrific suffering inflicted on Indigenous people as well as their relentless resistance, resilience, and determination to retain their land, languages, and sovereignty.

This seven-page excerpt documents the 1990 Oka Crisis, a 77-day armed standoff with Canadian police and military in the Mohawk territories of the Kahnawake and Kanesatake near Montreal.

The 500 Years of Indigenous Resistance Comic Book: Revised and Expanded by Gord Hill publishes on Oct. 26 from Arsenal Pulp.

This piece was produced in partnership with Publishers Weekly.

Panel Mania: ‘Run: Book One’

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Picking up where the late Rep. John Lewis’s acclaimed graphic memoir March ended, his new memoir, Run, opens as the Watts uprising breaks out, the 1965 Voting Rights Act becomes law, and the impact of Black Nationalism, Pan Africanism, the Vietnam war, and the anti-apartheid movement create new challenges to the tenets of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement and to young Lewis’s leadership of Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee.

Run invokes a new phase in the movement’s struggle against Jim Crow segregation and for Black voting rights, depicting the continuing racist violence directed at activists, as well as local segregationist acts of anti-Black voter suppression—such as closing polling places in Black neighborhoods—which seem eerily similar to our contemporary political conflicts over voting.

In this short excerpt, Lewis reflects on growing political factions within the ranks of the Black Civil Rights Movement and acknowledges the global nature of the Black liberation movement. The excerpt also includes L. Fury’s character designs and early sketches.

Excerpt provided by Abrams ComicArts from Run: Book One by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, with illustrations by Nate Powell and L. Fury © John Lewis and Andrew Aydin.

Bonus Links:
Difficult History: On John Lewis’s March

This piece was produced in partnership with Publishers Weekly.

Panel Mania: ‘Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts’

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Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts by Rebecca Hall and Hugo Martinez is a riveting combination of graphic memoir and inspirational scholarship.

An attorney frustrated by repeated encounters with sexism and racism in the criminal justice system, Hall returned to pursue a PhD in history, in a personal search for women warriors lost to history and with a larger scholarly goal of documenting women-led slave revolts during the colonial slave trade.

In this eight-page excerpt Hall’s dogged efforts to research a slave revolt in 1712 in New York City send her on a passionate academic quest to the vast and sometimes restricted 18th-century slave trade archives in New York City, London, and Liverpool.

Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts will be published by Simon & Schuster in June.

This piece was produced in partnership with Publishers Weekly.

Panel Mania: ‘Save It For Later’

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Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest by Nate Powell—the artist for John Lewis’s acclaimed Civil Rights graphic memoir,  March—is a deeply felt collection of comics essays exploring the conflicts and emotional scars of living through the Trump era while raising two young daughters. The book also explores the need to embrace some form of activist resistance that makes sense and makes a difference.

In this eight-page excerpt, National Book Award-winner Powell surveys life in a liberal college town surrounded by white supremacist activity, sundown towns, and local fascists.

Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest by Nate Powell is out now from Abrams ComicArts.

Bonus Link:
An Anti-Racist Graphic Novel Reading List

This piece was produced in partnership with Publishers Weekly.

Panel Mania: ‘Embodied’

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Embodied: An Intersectional Feminist Comics Poetry Anthology is being published to coincide with International Women’s Health Month in May, and a portion of the proceeds from its sale will go to the International Women’s Health Coalition.

Edited by the book’s publishers, Wendy Chin-Tanner and Tyler Chin-Tanner, Embodied offers 23 poems focused on gender, identity, and the body by an impressive selection of contemporary cis female, trans, and non-binary poets, adapted into comics narratives drawn, colored, and lettered by non-cis male artists.

From the book’s introduction: “Our vision with this book is to provide a platform for poets and artists of marginalized genders and identities to tell their own stories, at a time when they are most under siege.”

The comics poem featured in this excerpt is “Tapestry” by Khaty Xiong with art by Morgan Beem.

Embodied: An Intersectional Feminist Comics Poetry Anthology will be published by A Wave Blue World on May 18.

This piece was produced in partnership with Publishers Weekly.

Panel Mania: ‘The Thud’ by Mikael Ross

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Told with an endearing combination of empathy and humor, Mikael Ross’s The Thud is the story of Noel, a young boy with development disabilities who hears a sound—the thud of the title—and discovers his mother has fallen in the bathroom, hit her head, and is in a coma.
After his mother’s terrible injury, Noel’s secure and loving life with her is upended; he must leave home and is sent to live in a group home that offers him new opportunities for friendship, relationships, and personal growth.
In this excerpt, Noel is comforted by a kindly nurse at the hospital. The Thud by Mikael Ross is out now from Fantagraphics.

This piece was produced in partnership with Publishers Weekly.

Panel Mania: ‘I’m A Wild Seed’

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Sharon Lee De La Cruz’s I’m a Wild Seed is a playfully illustrated and thoughtfully conceived graphic memoir that explores her personal experiences accepting life as an intersectional Puerto-Rican/Dominican queer Afro-Latina.
In this engaging account, De La Cruz offers a brisk history the LGBTQ community and the struggle for queer rights, touching on the Stone Wall riots, the nature of toxic masculinity and the history of violent suppression of queer people as she guides the reader through a combination of personal (and often funny) anecdotes that methodically examine the nature of race, gender and sexuality. In this ten-page excerpt De La Cruz begins to tell the story of “how I came into my queerness as an adult.”
I’m a Wild Seed by Sharon Lee De La Cruz will be published in February by Street Noise Books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This piece was produced in partnership with Publishers Weekly.

Panel Mania: ‘Dune: The Graphic Novel’

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Frank Herbert’s epic science-fiction novel Dune has been adapted into a graphic novel by a creative team that includes Brian Herbert, the author’s son and an acclaimed science-fiction author in his own right, and novelist and comics writer Kevin J. Anderson, with art by Raúl Allén and Patricia Martín. The cover art comes from legendary comics artist Bill Sienkiewicz.
In this nine-page excerpt, Paul Atreides and members of the royal family prepare to travel to—and take control of—the planet Arrakis, the only source of “The Spice,” a rare and valuable substance that extends life and human capabilities.
Dune: The Graphic Novel will be published by Abrams ComicArts in November.

Bonus Link:
Objects of Fear and Worship: The Evolution of Aliens in Literature

This piece was produced in partnership with Publishers Weekly.

Panel Mania: ‘Naturalist: A Graphic Adaptation’

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Acclaimed science-comics writer Jim Ottaviani and artist C.M. Butzer team with the celebrated biologist and naturalist Edward O. Wilson to turn Naturalist, his 1994 memoir, into an equally delightful and engrossing graphic work that documents his life and highlights the importance of his career as a biologist.

In this 13-page excerpt, Wilson, in love and recently engaged, heads to New Guinea in 1954 to study his specialty, ants, alone and without high-tech devices, in an intriguing look at how a scientific field investigations were once conducted.

Edward O. Wilson’s Naturalist: A Graphic Adaptation by Jim Ottaviani and C.M. Butzer will be published in November by Island Press.

This piece was produced in partnership with Publishers Weekly.

Panel Mania: ‘My Broken Mariko’

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In manga artist Waka Hirako’s My Broken Mariko, Tomoyo, a young professional woman, is shocked to learn that Mariko, her closest friend, has committed suicide. But Tomoyo also knows Mariko was physically and psychologically abused by her father from a young age.
In this eight-page excerpt, Tomoyo decides to avenge the unnecessary death of her friend and honor her life by stealing Mariko’s ashes from her abusive father and taking her friend on a final journey to memorialize her life.
My Broken Mariko by Waka Hirako will be published by Yen Press in September.

This piece was produced in partnership with Publishers Weekly.