Year in Reading Outro

December 23, 2016 | 2 books mentioned 3

Well, that’s a wrap. We hope you enjoyed the series as much as we enjoyed putting it together. There’s so much here. We read about P.G. Wodehouse and Vladimir Nabokov accompanying the living as they bid farewell to the dead. We learned that Jacqueline Woodson won’t finish a book she doesn’t love. We learned The Golden Bowl is full of “yuge, yuge objects,” and that Tana French really, really likes Watership Down. We heard from writers who were living the dream, where the dream is living out of a suitcase. We discovered just what exactly is the thing about Los Angeles. That Book Twitter needs to fix its shit. That Zora Neale Hurston is the best way to start a new year. The Anaïs Nin will cast you into theunmoored realm of trenchant lust and forensic self-scrutiny.” That 100% of rock stars surveyed were inspired by Elizabeth Bishop. That books are “not only the bearers of ancestors, but, themselves, ANCESTORS.” That “balneological” means “relating to healing baths.” That there is a book devoted solely to the words needed for “uplands, waterlands, edge places, woodland, coasts, and stones.” What a series. 

We don’t have official numbers, but by our crude estimate, Year in Reading 2016 featured some 500 books. So happy reading, and happy new year. 

More from A Year in Reading 2016

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3 comments:

  1. Really love this feature every year. Between The Millions, the Guardian, misc. sites that do Most Overlooked….. there is just too much to read. So I have to choose with care.

  2. I’m missing the summary list of the top chosen books this year. Usually you help us out by sifting through and creating a handy shortlist of the most mentioned each year – is that not the case this year?

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