The Millions Top Ten: September 2013

October 7, 2013 | 15 books mentioned 2 2 min read

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for September.

This
Month
Last
Month
Title On List
1. 2. cover The Pioneer Detectives 3 months
2. 1. cover Taipei 4 months
3. 7. cover Fox 8 3 months
4. 5. cover The Orphan Master’s Son 4 months
5. cover Bleeding Edge 1 month
6. 10. cover Night Film 2 months
7. 8. cover Visitation Street 3 months
8. 9. cover The Interestings 3 months
9. cover MaddAddam 1 month
10. cover The Lowland 1 month

This month our second ebook original The Pioneer Detectives moves into the top spot as the book continues to garner very positive reviews from readers. We hope you’ll pick it up if you haven’t already.

Meanwhile, our list sees a big shake up as three books graduate to our Hall of Fame:

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk: Ben Fountain’s book won the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. Fountain appeared in our Year in Reading, and Edan Lepucki interviewed him in these pages last June.

Stand on Zanzibar: Ted Gioia penned a very popular piece about the remarkably prescient predictions contained within John Brunner’s book and readers ran to check it out.

The Middlesteins: Author Jami Attenberg made an appearance in our Year in Reading in December.

These graduates make room for three heavy-hitting debuts, all of which appeared in our big second-half preview: Bleeding Edge by Thomas Pynchon, MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood (don’t miss Atwood’s appearance in our Year in Reading; we haven’t quite tracked down Pynchon yet for this), and The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri.

Near Misses: Vampires in the Lemon Grove, The Flamethrowers, Life After Life, They Don’t Dance Much and Telex from Cuba. See Also: Last month’s list.

created The Millions and is its publisher. He and his family live in New Jersey.

2 comments:

  1. Dissident Gardens is a fine book even if its topics aren’t so fashionable for those who worship at the altar of hucksters like Tao Lin.

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