The Millions Top Ten: October 2022

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We spend plenty of time here at The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for October. This Month Last Month Title On List 1. 5. Sirens & Muses 3 months 2. 4. Sea of Tranquility 6 months 3. - The Passenger 1 month 4. 3. Either/Or 5 months 5. 7. Forbidden City 4 months 6. 6. The Angel of Rome: And Other Stories 4 months 7. 8. Paradais 5 months 8. 9. Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow 3 months 9. 10. When We Were Bright and Beautiful 2 months 10. - Shrines of Gaiety 1 month Two new titles make their debuts on October's list: Kate Atkinson's Shrines of Gaiety, one of last month's "near misses," joins us in tenth position, and Cormac McCarthy's The Passenger arrives in third. For each of the past five years, when we've put together our site's Most Anticipated lists, I've seen placeholders in the planning document for "Cormac McCarthy's New Orleans novel????" Each year, we'd sift through whispers to see what was up, when it was coming, if it was even being finished. Each year, we punted it to the next list. Well, finally, it felt real last summer, and there it was on our Second-Half Preview. Now, one of our longest awaited books is finally on shelves. (Your move, John Jeremiah Sullivan.) And it's actually part of a "a fascinating diptych," as Seth L. Riley put it in a recent review for our site. Of course, our list opened spaces for these two new books because two other books graduated to our site's Hall of Fame. Congratulations to Sequoia Nagamatsu and Matt Bell for earning our site's highest honor—a first for each one—with the success of How High We Go in the Dark and Refuse to Be Done, respectively. Next month, there should be space for yet another newcomer... or as always, potentially more. This month’s near misses included: The Tartar Steppe, The Hurting Kind, Cocoon, How to Read Now (Essays), and Properties of Thirst. See Also: Last month's list. [millions_email]

The Millions Top Ten: September 2022

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We spend plenty of time here at The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for September. This Month Last Month Title On List 1. 1. How High We Go in the Dark 6 months 2. 2. Refuse to Be Done 6 months 3. 3. Either/Or 4 months 4. 4. Sea of Tranquility 5 months 5. 5. Sirens & Muses 2 months 6. 6. The Angel of Rome: And Other Stories 3 months 7. 8. Forbidden City 3 months 8. 7. Paradais 4 months 9. 9. Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow 2 months 10. - When We Were Bright and Beautiful 1 month Precious little movement on this month's list, as nine of last month's titles return. Of the returning titles, two changed positions: Vanessa Hua's Forbidden City City switched places with Fernanda Melchor's Paradais. Dino Buzzati's The Tartar Steppe dropped out. The list's lone opening was filled by Jillian Medoff's novel When We Were Bright and Beautiful, which rose from last month's Near Misses. Lacking drama, I offer trivia: six of the titles on this month's list were covered in our First Half Book Preview, and three in our Second Half Book Preview. Only one title came without our advance promotion: Refuse to Be Done, Matt Bell's guide for writing and rewriting novels. I wonder if we can rewrite the list... Next month at least two spots will open, as at least two titles seem bound for our Hall of Fame. Will the newcomers filling their places be new to us, or familiar names among the Near Misses? There's just one way to find out. This month’s near misses included: Shrines of Gaiety, The Hurting Kind, How to Read Now (Essays), and Properties of Thirst. See Also: Last month's list. [millions_email]

The Millions Top Ten: August 2022

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We spend plenty of time here at The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for August. This Month Last Month Title On List 1. 3. How High We Go in the Dark 5 months 2. 2. Refuse to Be Done 5 months 3. 4. Either/Or 3 months 4. 5. Sea of Tranquility 4 months 5. - Sirens & Muses 1 month 6. 6. The Angel of Rome: And Other Stories 2 months 7. 8. Paradais 2 months 8. 7. Forbidden City 3 months 9. - Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow 1 month 10. 10. The Tartar Steppe 2 months We close out summer with one title headed to the Hall of Fame. By some measures, it took The Socratic Method six months to reach our site's hallowed hall; by others it took 2,400 years. That's characteristic of the season, I suppose, and how it blurs schedules, obliterates routines. (Among August's near misses is Tove Jansson's The Summer Book, proving that warm weather vibes arriving late still arrive right on time.) Either way, The Practitioner's Handbook author Ward Farnsworth has cultivated a durable audience on our site—this is his third time reaching the Hall since 2011. Our list opened another spot this month because Tolstoy Together: 85 Days of War and Peace dropped out of the running. What did I just write about how the summer months are not compatible with routines? Filling the two spots are new novels by Antonia Angress and Gabrielle Zevin. Both Angress's Sirens & Muses and Zevin's Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow published in July, and the pair was listed in our Great Second-Half 2022 Book Preview, where they earned high praise from our own Kaulie Lewis and Carolyn Quimby, respectively. Check back next month to see what's changed in the Fall. This month’s near misses included: How to Read Now (Essays), Properties of Thirst, Essays One, When We Were Bright and Beautiful, and The Summer Book. See Also: Last month's list. [millions_email]

The Millions Top Ten: July 2022

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We spend plenty of time here at The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for July. This Month Last Month Title On List 1. 2. The Socratic Method: A Practitioner's Handbook 6 months 2. 6. Refuse to Be Done 4 months 3. 5. How High We Go in the Dark 4 months 4. 7. Either/Or 2 months 5. 8. Sea of Tranquility 3 months 6. - The Angel of Rome: And Other Stories 1 month 7. 10. Forbidden City 2 months 8. - Paradais 1 month 9. - Tolstoy Together: 85 Days of War and Peace 1 month 10. - The Tartar Steppe 1 month Four titles bounced to our Hall of Fame this month: Ulysses: An Illustrated Edition by James Joyce and Eduardo Arroyo (illustrator), The Penguin Modern Classics Book by Henry Eliot, When We Cease to Understand the World by Benjamín Labatut, and Crossroads by Jonathan Franzen. This marks Franzen's fourth trip to our site's hallowed hall, and for streak spotters out there: it's his fourth consecutive novel to earn the honor. For the rest of the authors—even Sunny Jim—it's their first trip each. Their movements opened four new spots on our list, so this month we welcome The Angel of Rome by Jess Walter, Paradais by Fernanda Melchor, Tolstoy Together: 85 Days of War and Peace by Yiyun Li, and The Tartar Steppe by Dino Buzzati. Once again, among a group of four only one of these authors has reached our site's Hall of Fame: Walter's Beautiful Ruins made it in 2014. However, shout outs are due to both Jess Walter and Fernanda Melchor whose books were featured in our Great First Half 2022 Book Preview last January. (Yours truly previewed the Melchor...) Regular Millions readers may also recall last year's interview with Yiyun Li about 85 Days, a War and Peace-based and pandemic-inspired reading project. More esoteric Millions readers might just recall one of Li's best lines from it: "I ... need a big book in my daily reading. It’s sort of like your daily bread, right? We can eat oysters and anything else, but the daily bread is War and Peace." On the horizon we foresee at least one spot opening next month, so stay tuned and let's see what it'll be, and whether it brings company. This month’s near misses included: The Collected Stories (William Trevor), Pure Colour, Hell of a Book, The Hurting Kind, and Essays One. See Also: Last month's list. [millions_email]

The Millions Top Ten: June 2022

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We spend plenty of time here at The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for June. This Month Last Month Title On List 1. 1. Ulysses: An Illustrated Edition 6 months 2. 2. The Socratic Method: A Practitioner's Handbook 5 months 3. 3. The Penguin Modern Classics Book 6 months 4. 4. When We Cease to Understand the World 6 months 5. 7. How High We Go in the Dark 3 months 6. 6. Refuse to Be Done 3 months 7. - Either/Or 1 month 8. 9. Sea of Tranquility 2 months 9. 8. Crossroads 6 months 10. - Forbidden City 1 month It might surprise you to read that before this month, Karl Ove Knausgård had never sent a book to our site's Hall of Fame. It might surprise you if you didn't read carefully that now the Norwegian author's made a home there: The Morning Star did what all 3,936 pages of the six-part My Struggle series could not. (Sidebar: the sixth installment represents for 30% of those pages? Today I learned.) Meanwhile, Katie Kitamura's Intimacies dropped off the list this month, but we frequently see books come and go. Will it be back after July? You know where to look. The upshot is two spaces opened on this month's list, and were filled Elif Batuman's Either/Or and Vanessa Hua's Forbidden City. They occupy the seventh and tenth spots, respectively, and both were featured in our Great First-Half 2022 Book Preview earlier this year. Speaking of Great Book Previews, we expect to drop our enormous Second-Half 2022 list very soon. Stay tuned. This month’s near misses included: Tartar Steppe, Paradais, Pure Colour, The Hurting Kind, and Essays One. See Also: Last month's list. [millions_email]

The Millions Top Ten: May 2022

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We spend plenty of time here at The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for May. This Month Last Month Title On List 1. 1. Ulysses: An Illustrated Edition 5 months 2. 2. The Socratic Method: A Practitioner's Handbook 4 months 3. 4. The Penguin Modern Classics Book 5 months 4. 3. When We Cease to Understand the World 5 months 5. 5. The Morning Star 6 months 6. 6. Refuse to Be Done 2 months 7. 10. How High We Go in the Dark 2 months 8. 8. Crossroads 5 months 9. - Sea of Tranquility 1 month 10. - Intimacies 1 month Just one change to the top-half of this month's list, and it's a tiny one: When We Cease to Understand the World swapped places with The Penguin Modern Classics Book. This type of scarcely observable change has been notionally understood in the abstract for years, but it wasn't until a team of pioneering physicists got together that its dynamics were fully understoo--this is a Benjamín Labatut joke and I need to bail before I get carried away. The books in seventh through tenth positions changed more dramatically. How High We Go in the Dark rose three spots this month, and we also had two newcomers make the list. Longtime Millions staffer Emily St. John Mandel's latest novel Sea of Tranquility debuts in ninth position. It's "a work of literary science fiction in which Mandel crafts a tale of flawed and disparate characters—whose lives are unwittingly altered in time and space—yet linked by an anomalous glitch in time," K.E. Lanning wrote in the introduction to her interview with St. John Mandel last month. Rounding out this month's list is Katie Kitamura's Intimacies, which Sinead O'Shea described in a review for our site as "an elegant and gripping story about a female interpreter who is thrust into one of the International Criminal Court’s high-profile cases." Next month we should get at least one more newcomer on our list, so stay tuned to find out which. This month’s near misses included: Either/Or, Harlem Shuffle and The Collected Stories (William Trevor), Small Things Like These, and Shit Cassandra Saw: Stories. See Also: Last month's list. [millions_email]

The Millions Top Ten: April 2022

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We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for April. This Month Last Month Title On List 1. 1. Ulysses: An Illustrated Edition 4 months 2. 2. The Socratic Method: A Practitioner's Handbook 3 months 3. 3. When We Cease to Understand the World 4 months 4. 5. The Penguin Modern Classics Book 4 months 5. 4. The Morning Star 5 months 6. - Refuse to Be Done 1 month 7. 7. These Precious Days: Essays 6 months 8. - Crossroads 4 months 9. - Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus 6 months 10. - How High We Go in the Dark 1 month By golly, you pulled it off. Millions readers, egged on by our own Ed Simon, purchased enough copies of a hundred-year-old Ludwig Wittgenstein book to sustain Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus on six separate Top Ten lists. (It should be noted that those lists were non-consecutive: this journey began in August 2021, so it's taken nine months because it kept popping off the list into the "Near Misses"—only to return weeks later.) It'll be ten months by the time Wittgenstein's book reaches our site's Hall of Fame, but a century after publication, who's counting? Patience is a virtue, but persistence is a skill. This month we are also rejoined by Jonathan Franzen's Crossroads, which is back on the Top Ten for the first time since the end of 2021. In football, you never count out Tom Brady; in literature, you never count on Jon Franzen. Meanwhile our list's true newcomers are Matt Bell and Sequoia Nagamatsu, who join in the sixth and tenth positions for Refuse to Be Done and How High We Go in the Dark, respectively. Space for all four of these works was opened up by the graduation of four titles to our Hall of Fame. Three cheers for Anthony Doerr's Cloud Cuckoo Land, Sally Rooney's Beautiful World, Where Are You?, Lauren Groff's Matrix, and Richard Powers's Bewilderment. Each of these authors have been to the Hall of Fame before, but this will be Groff's third appearance. We began this write-up with persistence, and we end it with reliability. What will next month bring? As always, there's only one way to know. This month’s near misses included: Intimacies, The Magician, Sea of Tranquility, Harlem Shuffle and The Collected Stories (William Trevor).  See Also: Last month's list. [millions_email]

The Millions Top Ten: February 2022

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We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for February. This Month Last Month Title On List 1. 1. Ulysses: An Illustrated Edition 2 months 2. 2. The Morning Star 3 months 3. 3. Cloud Cuckoo Land 5 months 4. - The Socratic Method: A Practitioner's Handbook 1 month 5. 5. These Precious Days: Essays 4 months 6. 10. When We Cease to Understand the World 2 months 7. 6. The Penguin Modern Classics Book 2 months 8. 4. The Book of Form and Emptiness 6 months 9. 9. Matrix: A Novel 5 months 10. 7. Beautiful World, Where Are You 5 months We joked last month that Ludwig Wittgenstein was on the cusp of reaching our site's Hall of Fame, if only Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus placed on our Top Ten once more. (It has five months; it needs six.) The book's been a Millions favorite since Ed Simon described it as "poetry that gestures beyond poetry." Well, sorry Wittgenstein, but your work is among our "Near Misses," so the wait continues. After 100 years, what's another month? In any event, it's not surprising to see Ward Farnsworth’s The Socratic Method: A Practitioner's Handbook on this month's list. Once again, it's Ed Simon's fault. A couple weeks ago, in a piece where he called Socrates a "schmuck," Simon drew a through-line from the Greek philosopher into Larry David, Twitter, and so much of "what ails the body politic." Meanwhile, The Other Press's illustrated edition of Ulysses, which features art by Eduardo Arroyo, holds the top spot on this month's list⁠—fitting for the centennial of James Joyce’s original. (Now that I think of it, what is it with Millions readers and works from 1922?) This month we also saw Benjamín Labutut’s When We Cease to Understand the World rise four spots from 10th to sixth. This book on the relationship between genius, madness, and the observable world is unlike anything I've read. It would not shock me, Heisenberg, or Schrödinger, to see it rise more or drop off the list completely—perhaps both at once, if you catch my drift. This month’s near misses included: Crossroads, Intimacies, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, and The Magician. See Also: Last month's list. [millions_email]

The Millions Top Ten: January 2022

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We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for January. This Month Last Month Title On List 1. - Ulysses: An Illustrated Edition 1 month 2. 3. The Morning Star 2 months 3. 4. Cloud Cuckoo Land 4 months 4. 2. The Book of Form and Emptiness 5 months 5. 5. These Precious Days: Essays 3 months 6. - The Penguin Modern Classics Book 1 month 7. 6. Beautiful World, Where Are You 4 months 8. 8. Bewilderment 5 months 9. 9. Matrix: A Novel 4 months 10. - When We Cease to Understand the World 1 month Close counts in curling, or so the Winter Olympics announcers say, but close does not count for our site's Hall of Fame. You need six strong showings to reach the Hall. Alas, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus came up short by one. Ludwig Wittgenstein, if your ghost is reading this, you can take consolation in the fact that Ed Simon’s piece got Millions readers so excited about your work that for five months they dutifully purchased copies of your 100-year-old book. Also, get off the internet. Ghosts have better things to do. On the other hand, The House on Vesper Sands by Paraic O'Donnell is off to our site's Hall of Fame this month. It's the author's first appearance, and we congratulate them. These opened spots—plus another vacated by Jonathan Franzen’s Crossroads—made way for three titles on this month's list: In first position is The Other Press's illustrated edition of Ulysses, which features 300 color and black-and-white works by Spanish painter Eduardo Arroyo, and which was published this year for the centennial of James Joyce’s original. Last month, Sophia Stewart interviewed publisher Judith Gurewich about Arroyo's legacy and the development of the illustrated edition. Gurewich explained that "anybody will tremendously enjoy turning the pages—the drawings are at once complex, satirical, and super easy to grasp. No art history course required!" Henry Eliot’s encyclopedic series on Penguin Modern Classics earned sixth position on this month's list, demonstrating that Millions readers appreciated art books and books about books in addition to good old fashioned books. Finally, Benjamín Labutut’s When We Cease to Understand the World joined our list in the 10th space after making last month's "near misses." Having recently finished the book myself, I can personally sing its praises—or at least, I would like to sing its praises but I am still reeling from the experience, and words fail. Trust me. It's great. This month’s near misses included: Intimacies, The Magician, and Nightbitch. See Also: Last month's list. [millions_email]

The Millions Top Ten: December 2021

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We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for December. This Month Last Month Title On List 1. 1. The House on Vesper Sands 6 months 2. 3. The Book of Form and Emptiness 4 months 3. - The Morning Star 1 month 4. 8. Cloud Cuckoo Land 3 months 5. 9. These Precious Days: Essays 2 months 6. 10. Beautiful World, Where Are You 3 months 7. 6. Crossroads 3 months 8. 4. Bewilderment 4 months 9. 7. Matrix: A Novel 3 months 10. 5. Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus 5 months I need you to hold on. The surge is real, cases are rising, but the vaccines work. It's decoupled: your likelihood of ending up in the hospital is reduced if you're vaccinated, which is all along what the vaccines were supposed to do. But, remember: a small percentage of a bigger number can still produce a big number. We aren't out of the woods. Oh, right, we were talking about books. In that case, I still need you to hold on, Millions readers. Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus remains on our list, but it's in precarious position. We have the unprecedented chance to put a book from 1921 into the Hall of Fame, but we need two more strong showings from y'all. If you haven't read Ed Simon’s piece on Ludwig Wittgenstein, you must. Here it is. Here's a second link to it in case you didn't click it the first time. Carrying on. This month we bid farewell to Jonathan Lee’s The Great Mistake, which rode six straight strong showings into our site's Hall of Famed sunset. In its place, we welcome newcom—oh, no, wait we've seen you before, surely? Karl Ove Knausgaard, whose novel The Morning Star joins our ranks in the third spot. Knausgaard is no stranger to Millions readers but it may surprise you to learn he's not yet made the Hall of Fame . Will he this time? We'll see. This month’s near misses included: The Magician, A Calling for Charlie Barnes, Intimacies, Harlem Shuffle, and When We Cease to Understand the World. See Also: Last month's list. [millions_email]