The Millions Top Ten: April 2022

-

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for April.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
1.

Ulysses: An Illustrated Edition
4 months

2.
2.

The Socratic Method: A Practitioner’s Handbook
3 months

3.
3.

When We Cease to Understand the World
4 months

4.
5.

The Penguin Modern Classics Book

4 months

5.
4.

The Morning Star
5 months

6.


Refuse to Be Done
1 month

7.
7.

These Precious Days: Essays
6 months

8.


Crossroads
4 months

9.


Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
6 months

10.


How High We Go in the Dark
1 month

By golly, you pulled it off. Millions readers, egged on by our own Ed Simon, purchased enough copies of a hundred-year-old Ludwig Wittgenstein book to sustain Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus on six separate Top Ten lists. (It should be noted that those lists were non-consecutive: this journey began in August 2021, so it’s taken nine months because it kept popping off the list into the “Near Misses”—only to return weeks later.) It’ll be ten months by the time Wittgenstein’s book reaches our site’s Hall of Fame, but a century after publication, who’s counting? Patience is a virtue, but persistence is a skill.

This month we are also rejoined by Jonathan Franzen’s Crossroads, which is back on the Top Ten for the first time since the end of 2021. In football, you never count out Tom Brady; in literature, you never count on Jon Franzen.

Meanwhile our list’s true newcomers are Matt Bell and Sequoia Nagamatsu, who join in the sixth and tenth positions for Refuse to Be Done and How High We Go in the Dark, respectively.

Space for all four of these works was opened up by the graduation of four titles to our Hall of Fame. Three cheers for Anthony Doerr’s Cloud Cuckoo Land, Sally Rooney’s Beautiful World, Where Are You?, Lauren Groff’s Matrix, and Richard Powers’s Bewilderment. Each of these authors have been to the Hall of Fame before, but this will be Groff’s third appearance. We began this write-up with persistence, and we end it with reliability.

What will next month bring? As always, there’s only one way to know.

This month’s near misses included: Intimacies, The Magician, Sea of Tranquility, Harlem Shuffle and The Collected Stories (William Trevor).  See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: February 2022

-

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for February.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
1.

Ulysses: An Illustrated Edition
2 months

2.
2.

The Morning Star
3 months

3.
3.

Cloud Cuckoo Land
5 months

4.


The Socratic Method: A Practitioner’s Handbook

1 month

5.
5.

These Precious Days: Essays
4 months

6.
10.

When We Cease to Understand the World
2 months

7.
6.

The Penguin Modern Classics Book
2 months

8.
4.

The Book of Form and Emptiness
6 months

9.
9.

Matrix: A Novel
5 months

10.
7.

Beautiful World, Where Are You
5 months

We joked last month that Ludwig Wittgenstein was on the cusp of reaching our site’s Hall of Fame, if only Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus placed on our Top Ten once more. (It has five months; it needs six.) The book’s been a Millions favorite since Ed Simon described it as “poetry that gestures beyond poetry.” Well, sorry Wittgenstein, but your work is among our “Near Misses,” so the wait continues. After 100 years, what’s another month?

In any event, it’s not surprising to see Ward Farnsworth’s The Socratic Method: A Practitioner’s Handbook on this month’s list. Once again, it’s Ed Simon’s fault. A couple weeks ago, in a piece where he called Socrates a “schmuck,” Simon drew a through-line from the Greek philosopher into Larry David, Twitter, and so much of “what ails the body politic.”

Meanwhile, The Other Press’s illustrated edition of Ulysses, which features art by Eduardo Arroyo, holds the top spot on this month’s list⁠—fitting for the centennial of James Joyce’s original. (Now that I think of it, what is it with Millions readers and works from 1922?)

This month we also saw Benjamín Labutut’s When We Cease to Understand the World rise four spots from 10th to sixth. This book on the relationship between genius, madness, and the observable world is unlike anything I’ve read. It would not shock me, Heisenberg, or Schrödinger, to see it rise more or drop off the list completely—perhaps both at once, if you catch my drift.

This month’s near misses included: Crossroads, Intimacies, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, and The Magician. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: January 2022

-

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for January.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.


Ulysses: An Illustrated Edition
1 month

2.
3.

The Morning Star
2 months

3.
4.

Cloud Cuckoo Land
4 months

4.
2.

The Book of Form and Emptiness

5 months

5.
5.

These Precious Days: Essays
3 months

6.


The Penguin Modern Classics Book

1 month

7.
6.

Beautiful World, Where Are You
4 months

8.
8.

Bewilderment
5 months

9.
9.

Matrix: A Novel
4 months

10.


When We Cease to Understand the World
1 month

Close counts in curling, or so the Winter Olympics announcers say, but close does not count for our site’s Hall of Fame. You need six strong showings to reach the Hall. Alas, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus came up short by one. Ludwig Wittgenstein, if your ghost is reading this, you can take consolation in the fact that Ed Simon’s piece got Millions readers so excited about your work that for five months they dutifully purchased copies of your 100-year-old book. Also, get off the internet. Ghosts have better things to do.

On the other hand, The House on Vesper Sands by Paraic O’Donnell is off to our site’s Hall of Fame this month. It’s the author’s first appearance, and we congratulate them.

These opened spots—plus another vacated by Jonathan Franzen’s Crossroads—made way for three titles on this month’s list:

In first position is The Other Press’s illustrated edition of Ulysses, which features 300 color and black-and-white works by Spanish painter Eduardo Arroyo, and which was published this year for the centennial of James Joyce’s original. Last month, Sophia Stewart interviewed publisher Judith Gurewich about Arroyo’s legacy and the development of the illustrated edition. Gurewich explained that “anybody will tremendously enjoy turning the pages—the drawings are at once complex, satirical, and super easy to grasp. No art history course required!”

Henry Eliot’s encyclopedic series on Penguin Modern Classics earned sixth position on this month’s list, demonstrating that Millions readers appreciated art books and books about books in addition to good old fashioned books.

Finally, Benjamín Labutut’s When We Cease to Understand the World joined our list in the 10th space after making last month’s “near misses.” Having recently finished the book myself, I can personally sing its praises—or at least, I would like to sing its praises but I am still reeling from the experience, and words fail. Trust me. It’s great.

This month’s near misses included: Intimacies, The Magician, and Nightbitch. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: December 2021

-

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for December.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
1.

The House on Vesper Sands
6 months

2.
3.

The Book of Form and Emptiness
4 months

3.


The Morning Star
1 month

4.
8.

Cloud Cuckoo Land

3 months

5.
9.

These Precious Days: Essays
2 months

6.
10.

Beautiful World, Where Are You

3 months

7.
6.

Crossroads
3 months

8.
4.

Bewilderment
4 months

9.
7.

Matrix: A Novel
3 months

10.
5.

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
5 months

I need you to hold on. The surge is real, cases are rising, but the vaccines work. It’s decoupled: your likelihood of ending up in the hospital is reduced if you’re vaccinated, which is all along what the vaccines were supposed to do. But, remember: a small percentage of a bigger number can still produce a big number. We aren’t out of the woods.

Oh, right, we were talking about books. In that case, I still need you to hold on, Millions readers. Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus remains on our list, but it’s in precarious position. We have the unprecedented chance to put a book from 1921 into the Hall of Fame, but we need two more strong showings from y’all. If you haven’t read Ed Simon’s piece on Ludwig Wittgenstein, you must. Here it is. Here’s a second link to it in case you didn’t click it the first time.

Carrying on. This month we bid farewell to Jonathan Lee’s The Great Mistake, which rode six straight strong showings into our site’s Hall of Famed sunset.

In its place, we welcome newcom—oh, no, wait we’ve seen you before, surely? Karl Ove Knausgaard, whose novel The Morning Star joins our ranks in the third spot. Knausgaard is no stranger to Millions readers but it may surprise you to learn he’s not yet made the Hall of Fame .

Will he this time? We’ll see.

This month’s near misses included: The Magician, A Calling for Charlie Barnes, Intimacies, Harlem Shuffle, and When We Cease to Understand the World. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: November 2021

-

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for November.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
1.

The House on Vesper Sands
5 months

2.
2.

The Great Mistake
6 months

3.
10.

The Book of Form and Emptiness
3 months

4.
3.

Bewilderment

3 months

5.
4.

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
4 months

6.
7.

Crossroads

2 months

7.


Matrix: A Novel
2 months

8.


Cloud Cuckoo Land
2 months

9.


These Precious Days: Essays
1 month

10.
7.

Beautiful World, Where Are You
2 months

There’s some intrigue this month, as our list is reunited with two novels we last saw in September. Back then, Lauren Groff’s Matrix and Anthony Doerr’s Cloud Cuckoo Land held seventh and eighth position, respectively. This month, they once again hold seventh and eighth position, respectively. Plus ça change… At this rate, they might be bound for our Hall of Fame next July.

J. Robert Lennon sent his first book the Hall this month, as Subdivision capped off six months of strong showings. The spot it opened was filled by Ann Patchett’s essay collection These Precious Days—which Millions readers may recognize from its inclusion in our most recent Book Preview.

Meanwhile, two novels dropped off of this month’s list. Who knows? It’s possible that both Joshua Ferris’s A Calling for Charlie Barnes and Colm Tóibín’s The Magician will follow the same pattern as Groff’s and Doerr’s works mentioned above—returning in two months’ time as though nothing happened. We’ll have to wait and see.

One thing’s certain, however. By then, the list may be stuffed with books mentioned in our ongoing Year in Reading series, underway as I write this, and certainly set to inform our Top Tens in December and beyond. Which ones are on your list?

This month’s near misses included: Harlem ShuffleFierce Little Thing, and Nightbitch. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: October 2021

-

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for October.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
10.

The House on Vesper Sands
4 months

2.
1.

The Great Mistake
5 months

3.
5.

Bewilderment
2 months

4.
6.

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
3 months

5.
2.

Beautiful World, Where Are You
2 months

6.
3.

The Magician

2 months

7.


Crossroads
1 month

8.
9.

Subdivision
6 months

9.


A Calling for Charlie Barnes
1 month

10.
4.

The Book of Form and Emptiness
2 months

Can lists… listen? For months I’ve exclaimed our Top Ten’s consistency. The titles and their order have resisted change. Newcomers are as sporadic as they are welcome.

Well, no more. Like the goo in Ghostbusters 2, which animates in proportion to how much it’s heckled, our Top Ten converted months of my jibes into total metamorphosis. First place this month belongs to Paraic O’Donnell’s The House on Vesper Sands, which last month held… last. Down is up, which means up is also down. Ruth Ozeki’s The Book of Form and Emptiness moved from fourth to 10th. In between, two of last month’s top-three books—Sally Rooney’s Beautiful World… and Colm Tóibín’s The Magician—shifted into the middle this month.

If not my digs, then what shuffled the deck? If I possessed such unknowable answers, I’d be doing something else.

Some things held steady, though. Millions readers were so lathered up by Ed Simon’s piece about Ludwig Wittgenstein’s work that Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus rocketed onto our list, and three months later it’s not just hanging on; it’s climbing. Likewise, Millions readers welcomed Jonathan Franzen’s latest novel Crossroads onto this month’s list, which is fitting since Franzen’s made it to our site’s Hall of Fame three times. There’s comfort in stability, is there not?

Lastly, Joshua Ferris’s A Calling for Charlies Barnes entered our list in ninth position this month, after hovering in the “Near Misses” for a time. On our site last August, David Aaron wrote that “if this is not quite Ferris’s silliest work, it feels like his most personal.” Evidently, Millions readers were intrigued.

This month’s near misses included: Harlem Shuffle, Craft in the Real World, and Fierce Little Thing. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: September 2021

-

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for September.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
3.

The Great Mistake
4 months

2.


Beautiful World, Where Are You
1 month

3.


The Magician
1 month

4.


The Book of Form and Emptiness
1 month

5.


Bewilderment
1 month

6.
5.

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

2 months

7.


Matrix
1 month

8.


Cloud Cuckoo Land
1 month

9.
4.

Subdivision
5 months

10.
10.

The House on Vesper Sands
3 months

Hall of Famers alone do not explain why newcomers make up 60 percent of this month’s list. Only two spots opened because Kazuo Ishiguro’s Klara and the Sun and Tove Ditlevsen’s The Copenhagen Trilogy ascended to our site’s hallowed hall—Ishiguro’s second entry and Ditlevsen’s first.

Six newcomers may be a record for our site. Certainly it is since the start of 2020. We’ve averaged 2.45 new books each month over that span, only once welcoming four.

To reshape the list with six, then, means something else is happening. No doubt the popularity of these new books’ authors has something to do with it. Sally Rooney is in second position, Colm Tóibín holds third, Lauren Groff claims sixth, and this is not to make slouches out of Ruth Ozeki, Richard Powers, and Anthony Doerr, either.

Perhaps it’s seasonal. As the leaves drop through crisp air, do wallets open to purchase new books? Evidently so, and The Millions was on it. All six newcomers were on our Great Second-Half 2021 Book Preview.

Will next month’s list bring as much change to our list? Unlikely, but there’s only one way to find out.

This month’s near misses included: A Calling for Charlie Barnes, The Morning Star, Harlem Shuffle, Nightbitch, and Intimacies. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: August 2021

-

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for August.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
1.

Klara and the Sun
6 months

2.
3.

The Copenhagen Trilogy
6 months

3.
4.

The Great Mistake
3 months

4.
5.

Subdivision
4 months

5.


Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
1 month

6.
6.

Outlawed

5 months

7.


The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois
1 month

8.


Ghost Forest
1 month

9.
7.

Women and Other Monsters
4 months

10.
9.

The House on Vesper Sands
2 months

Our own Ed Simon wrote that “the idiosyncratic contours” of Ludwig Wittgenstein’s mind were on full display in Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. The work, “scribbl[ed] away as incendiary explosions echoed across the Polish countryside and mustard gas wafted over fields of corpses,” Simon continues, “is less the greatest philosophical work of the 20th century than it is one of the most immaculate volumes of modernist poetry written in the past hundred years.”

It’s also the newest addition to our site’s Top Ten, because if there’s one thing Millions readers evidently love, it’s “one of the oddest books in the history of logic.” This month, the fifth spot belongs to all of you.

Elsewhere on our list, we opened three spots because Lauren Oyler’s Fake Accounts graduated to our Hall of Fame while Matthew Salesses’s Craft in the Real World and Viet Thanh Nguyen’s The Committed both dropped out.

After Wittgenstein, those spots are presently occupied by Honorée Fanonne Jeffers’s The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois and Pik-Shuen Fung’s Ghost Forest. The two novels, published in August and July, respectively, were featured in our Great Second-Half 2021 Book Preview, where Jianan Qian wrote previews for both.

Writing of Love Songs, Qian wrote:
In her ambitious fiction debut, the 2020 National Book Award-nominated poet meditates on African-American history from the colonial slave trade to our current, turbulent age.
…and of Ghost Forest:
This is a fascinating epic of a Chinese-Canadian family, heartbreaking, daring, and relieving.
Solid picks, both. Stay tuned next month to see at least two newcomers, and to find out whether Wittgenstein endures.

This month’s near misses included: Nightbitch, Something New Under the Sun, and Intimacies. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: July 2021

-

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for July.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
2.

Klara and the Sun
5 months

2.
3.

Fake Accounts
6 months

3.
4.

The Copenhagen Trilogy
5 months

4.
8.

The Great Mistake
2 months

5.
10.

Subdivision
3 months

6.
7.

Outlawed

4 months

7.
9.

Women and Other Monsters
3 months

8.


Craft and the Real World
2 months

9.


The House on Vesper Sands
1 month

10.


The Committed
1 month

Three books head to our Hall of Fame this month, and several books swapped places. Basically, our Top Ten did the Cha-Cha Slide. (“Slide to the left / slide to the right / criss-cross!”)

Before we welcome the new additions, let’s take it back now, y’all. After six months of strong showings, A Swim in a Pond in the Rain, No One Is Talking About This, and Detransition, Baby have each graduated. It’s the first time for Patricia Lockwood and Torrey Peters, but it’s the fourth book George Saunders has sent to our Hall: Tenth of December made it in ’13, Fox 8 in ’14, and Lincoln in the Bardo in ’17. (“Everybody clap your hands!”)

The new books on this month’s list are The Committed, The House on Vesper Sands, and Craft and the Real World—the latter returning after a one-month absence. In a piece for our site early this year, Neelanjana Banerjee called Craft and the Real World “a blueprint for a way forward to build better writing programs, and thus a new kind of writer and teacher who can imagine beyond a structure that often hurt them and left them in need of repair.”

Among the near misses this month are Rachel Yoder’s Nightbitch and Dana Spiotta’s Whereabouts. The Millions interviewed both authors last month, and you can read those here, and here, respectively.

That’s all for now, so cha cha real smooth until next month.

This month’s near misses included: Nightbitch, Whereabouts, Vernon Subutex, Great Circle and Wayward. See Also: Last month’s list.

The Millions Top Ten: June 2021

-

We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use those stats to find out what books have been most popular with our readers in recent months. Below you’ll find our Millions Top Ten list for June.

This Month
Last Month

Title
On List

1.
1.

A Swim in a Pond in the Rain
6 months

2.
2.

Klara and the Sun
4 months

3.
3.

Fake Accounts
5 months

4.
4.

The Copenhagen Trilogy
4 months

5.
5.

No One Is Talking About This
6 months

6.
6.

Detransition, Baby

6 months

7.
7.

Outlawed
3 months

8.


The Great Mistake
1 month

9.
9.

Women and Other Monsters
2 months

10.
8.

Subdivision
2 months

Johnathan Lee’s The Great Mistake appears on this month’s list. Published in the middle of June, it should be familiar to Millions readers who caught its mention in our First-Half 2021 Book Preview. At the time, Il’ja Rákoš noted that Lee’s novel had drawn early comparisons to both Denis Johnson’s Train Dreams and John Williams’s Stoner. That bodes well, since those two novels are in our site’s Hall of Fame. Five more write-ups like this, and Lee’s will join them.

Elsewhere on this month’s list, May’s top seven remain June’s. May’s eighth book became June’s tenth. Even the near misses held steady. All this points to one place: Millions readers are ready for that Second-Half Preview to drop.

Well, stay tuned this week…

This month’s near misses included: The House on Vesper Sands, The Committed, Vernon Subutex, Selected Stories, 1968-1994, and Whereabouts. See Also: Last month’s list.