Curiosities

E-Books Rise Up

Are e-books more than just a publishing platform? Could they be "a whole new literary form"?
Curiosities

Not Literary, But Awesome

Russian scientists claim they'll be able to clone a mammoth "within 5 years."
Curiosities

TimeScapes

Even if Tom Lowe's forthcoming debut film TimeScapes consists solely of this production footage on loop, it'll still be jaw-droppingly beautiful.
Curiosities

Life and Fate and Life and Fate

Stephen Dodson wasn't the only one inspired to write about Vasily Grossman's Life and Fate this month. Over at The New Republic, Adam Kirsch calls Grossman's masterpiece one of the world's "very greatest Holocaust novels."
Curiosities

Another Reason to Subscribe to The Millions

With the US Postal Service facing massive cuts to its budget, Saturday delivery may soon become a thing of the past. Print publications are bracing themselves for this possibility.
Curiosities

Financing Cloud Atlas

The multinational production of the (Millions favorite) Cloud Atlas movie, "in all its glorious confusion, also serves as a guidepost to the future of the film business."
Curiosities

Goodreads Choice Awards

The results of this year's Goodreads Choice Awards are in, and a debut novelist took home Favorite Book of 2011 honors. Veronica Roth, author of Divergent, thanks her fans in this video. Other notable winners include Haruki Murakami's 1Q84 and Tina Fey's Bossypants, which won the Best Fiction and Best Humor categories, respectively. (They were also reviewed on The Millions here and here, respectively.)
Curiosities

Full Stop Goes Partisan

Here's a year-end series with some sharp teeth. In the spirit of The Partisan Review's provocative questionnaire from 1939, Full Stop is asking dozens of writers "specifically political questions". The series began yesterday with Marilynne Robinson.
Curiosities

Lev Grossman on Aspiring Writers

Lev Grossman offers some words of encouragement for aspiring writers: "because it turns out that talent, whatever that is, and that glowy aura, are only part of the picture."
Curiosities

“How should intellectuals write about acts of immense depravity?”

This is a fantastic piece on W. H. Auden, "The Murder of Lidice", and the importance of the ideological and political contexts of war. Joanna Bourke writes, "the flood of poems [after the Lidice massacre] actually served to draw attention away from the people of Lidice and towards the swollen sensibilities of the poets and their readers."