“Informational Text” vs. Fiction

December 14, 2012 | 1 book mentioned 2

The Common Core State Standards in English, which have been adopted in 46 states and the District, call for public schools to ramp up nonfiction so that by 12th grade students will be reading mostly ‘informational text’ instead of fictional literature,” writes Lyndsey Layton. Is this the end of The Catcher in the Rye?

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2 comments:

  1. The increase in informational texts should be spread throughout all courses, not just in English, according to the Common Core.

  2. “Myth: The Standards don’t have enough emphasis on fiction/literature.

    Fact: The Standards require certain critical content for all students, including: classic myths and stories from around the world, America’s Founding Documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Appropriately, the remaining crucial decisions about what content should be taught are left to state and local determination. In addition to content coverage, the Standards require that students systematically acquire knowledge in literature and other disciplines through reading, writing, speaking, and listening.”

    So, uh, no.

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