Recent Articles

September 14, 2017

Blackness in Bedlam: On Toni Morrison’s ‘The Origin of Others’ 0

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It can be incapacitating, seeing your suffering in the mirror.

September 13, 2017

Pushing the Envelope: The Millions Interviews Alex Gilvarry 0

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“Growing up in Staten Island, I sort of grew up with a chip on my shoulder, with that feeling that I’ve got to prove myself to people—to people from Manhattan, the Upper East Side.  I think I even came into the book business with a chip on my shoulder, like I had to prove myself somehow. It drove me.  But you’ve got to realize it. Otherwise, this kind of thinking can destroy you.”

September 13, 2017

How to Finish a Fairy Tale 0

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“I just didn’t see the textual evidence for it. If Mark Twain wanted to make somebody black, he would make them black. He was not shy about dealing with matters of race.” For The New Yorker, Mythili G. Rao on the complicated backstory to the upcoming publication of The Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine, a “new” children’s book by Mark […]

September 13, 2017

Booker Prize Offers Up Eclectic 2017 Shortlist 4

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The Booker Prize has whittled down its longlist to an intriguing shortlist, and none of the authors tapped has previously won the Prize.

September 13, 2017

Rare Consolation: Reading A Memoir of Addiction 0

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Rausing thoughtfully, painstakingly, works a deep groove into the stubborn surface of certain bedeviling questions: “How do you write about addiction?” “Who can help the addict?”

September 12, 2017

Buzzing Bits of Memory: On Omar Robert Hamilton’s ‘The City Always Wins’ 0

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Hamilton has channeled the effusive energy of the revolution to create a narrative of stunning fragments. But the fragments hardly coalesce to constitute a novel.

September 12, 2017

Can’t We Go Back to Page One 0

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A memoir by Winnie-the-Pooh author A.A. Milne shows a writer frustrated at how his creation undermined his adult literary cred. Republished 70 years after it went out of print, It’s Too Late Now reveals a trapped Milne wishing for more control over his own narrative: “I wanted to escape from [children’s books] as I had […]

September 12, 2017

Tuesday New Release Day: Krauss; Szabó; Yamashita; Locke; Hasbún; Rowe; Olukotun; Ng 0

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Out this week: Forest Dark by Nicole Krauss; Katalin Street by Magda Szabó; Letters to Memory by Karen Tei Yamashita; Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke; Affections by Rodrigo Hasbún; A Loving, Faithful Animal by Josephine Rowe; After the Flare by Deji Bryce Olukotun; and Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng. For more on these and other new titles, go read our most recent book preview.

September 12, 2017

Edgar Allan Poe Was a Broke-Ass Freelancer 6

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For his entire oeuvre—all his fiction, poetry, criticism, lectures—Poe earned only about $6,200 in his lifetime, or approximately $191,087 adjusted for inflation.

September 11, 2017

Haunted by Ghosts: The Millions Interviews Jesmyn Ward 0

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I’m always thinking about how black people survive.