Reviews Archives - Page 75 of 88 - The Millions

February 20, 2008

Adventures in Consciousness: A Review of Deborah Eisenberg’s Under the 82nd Airborne 4

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In the fiction-writing course I took my junior year of college, a professor assigned a story by Deborah Eisenberg, a writer of whom I’d never heard. We’d been studying the art of dialogue, and I knew enough to admire the characters’ hesitations and evasions, but somehow the story didn’t quite ignite for me. This is […]

February 19, 2008

The Elusive Thread of Memory: The Displaced World of Mavis Gallant 3

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Jean-Paul Sartre visited Montreal in the 1940s for a speaking engagement. In marked contrast to the socially progressive nature of much of Quebec today, Quebec then cowed under the unyielding hand of the Church. Hostile to Sartre’s visit, the media barons instructed their reporters – perhaps tacitly, perhaps not – to be as unwelcoming as […]

February 19, 2008

Expat Laureate: Paul Bowles’s Too Far From Home 2

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The short story was but one of many writing genres embraced by author Paul Bowles, known also for his novels, travel essays and poems. The influential American writer drew the admiration of other literary giants such as Tobias Wolff and Norman Mailer, who said Bowles “let in the murder, the drugs, the incest, the death […]

February 11, 2008

Dangerous Liaisons: A Review of Tim Weiner’s Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA 1

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More than any other government agency, the CIA has found itself the target of criticism from both the left and the right. Liberals tend to fault the agency for what it’s done – spying on American citizens, conspiring to overthrow legitimate foreign governments, operating secret prisons around the world – while conservatives lament what the […]

January 28, 2008

Trading Ideals: A review of Edward Gresser’s Freedom From Want 0

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With the prospect of a Democrat in the White House, paired with a continued Democratic majority in Congress, many old and new ideas on the liberal agenda are poised to come to fruition in 2009. One item likely to be on the to-do list is the future of international trade. In Freedom From Want: American […]

January 21, 2008

Only a Pawn in Their Game: A review of Robert Lohr’s The Chess Machine 1

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In the summer of 2006, on a small stage in downtown Toronto, the Emperor Napoleon was facing off in a game of chess against the “Mechanical Turk.” It was 1809, continental Europe, and Malzel, who recently purchased the legendary chess-playing automaton, was transporting this curious contraption from town to town to square off against the […]

January 15, 2008

Present-ing the 70s: A Review of Christopher Sorrentino’s Trance 1

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In his “Theses on the Philosophy of History,” the philosopher Walter Benjamin gives the old truism that all history is present history a characteristically gnomic twist. “Every image of the past that is not recognized by the present as one of its own concerns,” he writes, “threatens to disappear irretrievably.” Perhaps it’s a measure of […]

January 14, 2008

A Mexican Interlude: A Review of The Lawless Roads by Graham Greene 3

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This guest contribution comes from Kevin Hartnett. Hartnett lives in Philadelphia with his fiance. After graduating from college in 2003, he joined Teach For America and taught sixth grade in the Bronx for two years. He enjoys politics and travel and writing about both. In early 1938, at the behest of the Vatican, Graham Greene […]

January 13, 2008

Gonzo Got It: A Review of Gonzo by Jann Wenner 1

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After reading the new oral biography of Hunter S. Thompson, Gonzo, by Thompson’s friend and patron, Rolling Stone chief Jann Wenner, and former R.S. writer Corey Seymour, I have come to believe that Thompson deserves his iconic status in the history of American letters. Many will disagree, wondering how in the world a drug addicted, […]

January 3, 2008

Winter Wilderness: A Review of Snow by Orhan Pamuk 2

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This guest contribution comes from Kevin Hartnett. Hartnett lives in Philadelphia with his fiance. After graduating from college in 2003, he joined Teach For America and taught sixth grade in the Bronx for two years. He enjoys politics and travel and writing about both. Snow, Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk’s 2004 novel, opens as Ka, a […]